Global Agenda Council on Space Security 2012-2014

 

The challenge

From North Korea’s satellite launch to the meteor impact in Russia, space was in the news as a very public source of risk in the past year. But there were great progress and success stories, too. A private sector firm ferried supplies to and from the International Space Station for the first time. From tourism to mining asteroids, space entrepreneurialism is growing rapidly, with activity diversifying away from purely government programmes. Space technologies and services are also empowering civil society organizations. They are using satellite imaging capability that was once the preserve of intelligence agencies to defend human rights, prosecute war criminals and protect wildlife and World Heritage sites. Yet, space security remains detached and distant in the imaginations of most decision-makers. Too often, they overlook some of the short-term opportunities to use space-based technologies and services to help with some of Earth’s most pressing challenges. They include monitoring climate change and delivering connectivity and education services to remote areas. Over the longer term, the number of government and private sector bodies with activities in space will continue to increase, and they will use space in a wide range of ways. Hence, the sustainability of Earth’s orbits will become a governance challenge.

What the Council is doing about it

Bringing Space Down to Earth: Publication Preview

The World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Space Security is publishing a book that breaks through the technical jargon and clearly explains how space-based technologies and services are crucial to face society’s greatest challenges. In a straight-forward manner, the Global Agenda Council on Space Security aims to inform readers about a wide range of opportunities they may not have known were possible.

Download the Publication Preview at wef.ch/spacepreview 

This pre-launch preview offers readers an overview of the book’s content − 12 chapters spanning topics from food security and education, to disaster management and climate change.

Each chapter acts as a guide, summarizing the challenges humankind faces, the potential tools and solutions provided by space-based technologies and services, and case studies showing how these tools and solutions are already being applied.

Once an exclusive resource, space-based technologies and their applications are now increasingly available to governments, businesses and civil society organizations. From monitoring human rights violations and the impacts of climate change to helping people find the fastest way home, space technologies are being applied in unexpected and innovative ways.

Bringing Space Down to Earth will be serialized online and published as a book in 2014.

“Yet space security remains detached and distant in the imaginations of most decision-makers. Too often they overlook some of the short-term opportunities to use space-based technologies and services to help with some of Earth’s most pressing challenges. These include monitoring climate change and delivering connectivity and education services to remote areas.”

To get involved please contact

Research Analyst: Rigas Hadzilacos, Associate, Global Agenda Councils, rigas.hadzilacos@weforum.org 
Council Manager: Bruce Weinelt, Director, Head of Telecommunications Industry, bruce.weinelt@weforum.org 
Forum Lead: Martina Gmür, Senior Director, Head of the Network of Global Agenda Councils, martina.gmur@weforum.org 

What we're working on:

National Regulation of Space Activities (Space Regulations Library), Ram S. Jakhu

"International Safeguards and Satellite Imagery", B. Jasani, I. Niemeyer, S. Nussbaum, B. Richter and G. Stein

"Globalization to Kokumin Kokka (Globalization and Nation States)", Kazuto Suzuki with Fukuji Taguchi

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