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Middle East and North Africa @ Risk 2010

 
Middle East and North Africa @ Risk 2010

In a global world, where every stakeholder is increasingly exposed to natural and systemic risks, we can do much better in terms of building both global and institutional capabilities around risk resilience. More than ever, deeper and shared insight is needed to respond effectively to global challenges. In particular, understanding the systemic nature of global risks can contribute to closing the widening gap between emerging risks and our collective ability to understand and respond in the global public interest.The World Economic Forum’s work on global risks offers a unique perspective in some of the most pressing global challenges facing industries and governments in the coming decade. By focusing on risk context and interconnectedness, the Forum provides frameworks for analysis, dialogue and collaborative action to help decision-makers improve the resilience of global, regional and industry systems. The Forum also highlights the opportunities that unfold when risks and their interdependencies are better understood. As part of this effort, the Middle East at Risk 2010 report is an important publication that draws on the insights of the Forum’s Arab Business Council and Network of Global Agenda Councils. It builds on Global Risks 2010, providing relevant macro analyses that are particularly important for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The report focuses on three risk areas that are specifically relevant to the region: water scarcity, energy security and under investment in infrastructure. Not only are these pressing issues in their own right given the region’s social, geopolitical, economic and environmental context, but all three are also highly interconnected. Examining these interlinkages provides greater insight on the potential for contagion and risk compounding, as well as illuminating the levers and trade-offs involved in risk response by the public and private sectors. Ther eport also examines the potential for highly functional, regionally focused institutions and mechanisms to support domestic action in both the private and public sectors, and highlights the benefits of developing regional networks for sharing physical and knowledge-based assets relevant to risk. Over the next year, the Forum will build on its leading collaborative multistakeholder network of government, business and civil society leaders and inaugurate a Global Risk Response Network to serve as a virtual locus ofinteractions on core global risks. It will integrate the foremost thinking on a broad range of risks, enhancing policy and business decision-making by providing a timely and relevant depiction of global risks.