Media, Entertainment and Sport

Welcome to the language capital of the world: Queens, New York

The Empire State Building (C) sits between the Bank of America building (L) and the Chrysler Building (R) at sunset in New York, September 11, 2010. REUTERS/Gary Hershorn (UNITED STATES  - Tags: ANNIVERSARY CITYSCAPE DISASTER) - RTR2IAFQ

The Queens district of New York contains more languages than anywhere else in the world. Image: REUTERS/Gary Hershorn

Gus Lubin
Senior Correspondent, Business Insider
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Image: Business Insider

There are as many as 800 languages spoken in New York City, and nowhere in the world has more than Queens, according to the Endangered Language Alliance (ELA).

You can see many of the languages in the map above, which is featured in "Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas" by Rebecca Solnit and Joshua Jelly-Schapiro. The map was created by Molly Roy with help from the ELA, and also shows libraries, museums, and other linguistic centers.

"The capital of linguistic diversity, not just for the five boroughs, but for the human species, is Queens," Solnit and Jelly-Schapiro write.

The five miles from Astoria to Forest Hills have a dense progression of languages: Greek, Filipino, Urdu, Indonesian, Russian, Japanese, Lithuanian, and others, including more obscure ones like Chavacano, Waray-Waray, Minangkabau, and Bukharian. Here’s a close-up:

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Image: Business Insider

One limit of the map is that every language shows up only once, when in fact many show up throughout the borough. Mandarin, for instance, is listed in Flushing, which is Queens' original Chinatown, but not in Elmhurst, which also has a prominent Chinese community.

Flushing also has pockets of Cantonese, Shanghainese, Taishanese, Sichuanese, and other dialects. Korean and Mongolian are nearby, too. A close-up:

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Image: Business Insider
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Solnit has also published atlases of San Francisco and New Orleans.

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