Fourth Industrial Revolution

The lack of women in tech is actually getting worse

A Businesswoman is silhouetted as she makes her way under the Arche de la Defense, in the financial district west of Paris, November 20, 2012. France said its economy was sound and reforms were on track after credit ratings agency Moody's stripped it of the prized triple-A badge due to an uncertain fiscal and economic outlook. Monday's downgrade, which follows a cut by Standard & Poor's in January, was expected but is a blow to Socialist President Francois Hollande as he tries to fix France's finances and revive the euro zone's second largest economy.   REUTERS/Christian Hartmann (FRANCE  - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS) - RTR3ANMB

The tech world is suffering from a shortage of female workers. Image: REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Biz Carson
Tech Reporter, Business Insider
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There has been a lot of talk about how to get women into tech, particularly on company boards and into leadership positions.

Yet despite the scrutiny, the number of boards with no women increased in 2017, according to Silicon Valley Bank's 2017 "Startup Outlook" report.

More than 70% of the 941 startups surveyed did not have a single female board member in 2017, up from 66% the year before.

And it's not just board seats. The number of companies with no women in executive positions also increased in 2017, to more than half of the companies surveyed.

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Image: Silicon Valley Bank US Startup Outlook Report 2017

It's a worrying uptick to a trend that has received a lot of lip service but little action.

When First Round Capital conducted a similar survey six months ago, nearly a third of the 700 startups it surveyed hadn't even talked about diversity as a company priority.

According to Silicon Valley Bank, at least a quarter of the companies that responded did have some diversity plans. But that doesn't mean companies will be able to reverse this trend. Even Facebook, with its best-laid plans, has struggled with promoting diversity and inclusion in its ranks.

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Related topics:
Fourth Industrial RevolutionEquity, Diversity and InclusionEducation and Skills
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