Climate Change

5 places relocating people because of climate change

Climate change is already forcing some communities to relocate Image: REUTERS/Andres Forz

Charlotte Edmond
Senior Writer, Formative Content
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An abandoned house that is affected by seawater during high-tides stands next to a small lagoon near the village of Tangintebu on South Tarawa in the central Pacific island nation of Kiribati May 25, 2013. Kiribati consists of a chain of 33 atolls and islands that stand just metres above sea level, spread over a huge expanse of otherwise empty ocean. With surrounding sea levels rising, Kiribati President Anote Tong has predicted his country will likely become uninhabitable in 30-60 years because of inundation and contamination of its freshwater supplies. Picture taken May 25, 2013.  REUTERS/David Gray     (KIRIBATI - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS SOCIETY)ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 09 OF 42 FOR PACKAGE  'KIRIBATI - GONE IN 60 YEARS'. SEARCH 'KIRIBATI' FOR ALL IMAGES - RTX10LQV
Image: REUTERS/David Gray
An afternoon storm looms above fishermen on the mud flats of a Suva beach September 9, 2001. [Fiji's general election has ended after a week of polling with caretaker Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase expected to approach Fiji's president form a majority coalition government after negotiations with minor parties on September 10, 2001.] - RTXKQTG
An afternoon storm looms above fishermen on the mud flats of a Suva beach Image: REUTERS
A girl fishes on her boat at a polluted beach in central Honiara September 14, 2012. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will visit Solomon Islands on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II to commemorate her Diamond Jubilee on September 16. REUTERS/Daniel Munoz (SOLOMON ISLANDS - Tags: SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) - RTR37Z2Q
A girl fishes on her boat at a polluted beach in central Honiara Image: REUTERS/Daniel Munoz
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U.S. President Barack Obama views Bear Glacier on a boat tour of Kenai Fjords National Park in Seward, Alaska September 1, 2015. During a three-day visit Obama is also slated to meet people in remote Arctic communities whose way of life is affected by rising ocean levels, creating images designed to build support for regulations to curb carbon emissions. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst - RTX1QODE
Image: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
The large seawall that protects Galveston from major storms and the rising waters of the Gulf of Mexico is seen on Galveston Island, Texas March 6, 2014. To match Special Report SEALEVEL-FIXES/GALVESTON  Picture taken March 6, 2014. REUTERS/Rick Wilking (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT DISASTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY) - RTR4FCYO
Image: REUTERS/Rick Wilking
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