Economic Growth

These are the 15 fastest growing US cities

An Albanian holds up a U.S. flag as President George W. Bush's motorcade passes through central Tirana central Tirana June 10, 2007. Bush said on Sunday the United Nations should grant independence quickly to the breakaway Serbian province of Kosovo, and if Russia continued to block it the West would act.REUTERS/Damir Sagolj    (ALBANIA) - RTR1QNTJ

The population in the South grew at a faster rate than any other US region between 2015 and 2016 Image: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Melia Robinson
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United States

It's said that Texans have only one setting: Go big.

The population in the South grew at a faster rate than any other US region between 2015 and 2016, according to new data released from the US Census Bureau.

And in a list of the fastest-growing US cities with populations of 50,000 or more, Texas claimed four of the top five spots.

Conroe, Texas, a northern Houston suburb, topped the list. Its population grew 7.8% to hit 82,286 residents last year — a growth rate more than 11 times that of the nation, the AP reports. Almost 20% of the population lives below the poverty line, despite a relatively low unemployment rate, according to the 2015 American Community Survey.

Four cities in the West cracked the list released by the US Census Bureau, while the Northeast was noticeably absent. Without further adieu, here's the list.

The 15 Fastest-Growing Cities

1. Conroe City, Texas (pop. 82, 286)

2. Frisco, Texas (pop. 163,656)

3. McKinney, Texas (pop. 172,298)

4. Greenville, South Carolina (pop. 67,453)

5. Georgetown, Texas (pop. 67,140)

6. Bend, Oregon (pop. 91,122)

7. Buckeye, Arizona (pop. 64,629)

8. Bonita Springs, Florida (pop. 54,198)

9. New Braunfels, Texas (pop. 73,959)

10. Murfreesboro, Tennessee (pop. 131,947)

11. Lehi, Utah (pop. 61,130)

12. Cedar Park, Texas (pop. 68,918)

13. Meridian, Idaho (pop. 95,623)

14. Ankeny, Iowa (pop. 58,627)

15. Fort Myers, Florida (pop. 77,146)

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