Education

Bermuda is planning to reverse the right of same-sex couples to marry

A box of cupcakes are seen topped with icons of same-sex couples at City Hall in San Francisco, June 29, 2013. Same-sex couples rushed to San Francisco's City Hall on Saturday to be legally married after the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals officially ended California's ban on gay marriage following a landmark ruling at the Supreme Court this week. REUTERS/Stephen Lam (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY POLITICS FOOD)

Same-sex marriage is now legal in 26 nations. Image: REUTERS/Stephen Lam

Lin Taylor
Journalist, Thomson Reuters Foundation
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In a rare move, Bermuda's governor on Wednesday approved a bill to reverse the right of gay couples to marry in the British overseas territory, despite a Supreme Court ruling authorising same-sex marriage last year.

Under the Domestic Partnership Act 2017, already passed by Bermuda's House of Assembly and Senate, any Bermudian will be allowed to form domestic partnerships which the government says will offer equal rights.

Same-sex couples who wed in recent months will not have their marital status annulled.

Here are some facts about same-sex marriage around the world:

* Same-sex marriage is legal in 26 nations: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Uruguay, United States.

*It is also set to become legal in Austria and Taiwan, following court rulings on the matter in 2017.

* In some of these countries, such as Mexico and Britain, marriage is only open to same-sex couples in some regions. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom where same-sex marriage is not allowed.

* The first country to legalise same-sex marriage was the Netherlands in 2001.

Image: Statista

* Some Australian states ruled homosexual acts to be illegal until just 20 years ago.

* In Africa, where homosexuality is a crime in many countries and can lead to imprisonment or the death penalty, South Africa alone has granted the same access to gay couples. Same-sex marriage legislation came into force there in 2006.

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* No countries in Asia allow same-sex couples to marry or enter civil unions of any kind. In May, Taiwan's constitutional court ruled that same-sex couples have the right to legally marry, the first such ruling in Asia.

* Almost one in three adults globally believe people of the same sex should be allowed to marry, a survey of almost 100,000 people in 65 countries showed in 2016. SOURCES: International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA), Pew Research Center, Reuters.

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EducationGender Inequality
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