Future of the Environment

Energy-short Pakistan moves to power up solar manufacturing

Technicians work on solar panel in power station at Hub about 25 km (15 miles) from Karachi on June 18, 2010. Pakistan this year expects to finalise four wind power deals worth $500 million, to exploit a renewable resource that has been barely tapped in a country with a yawning gap between power capacity and demand. Pakistan is also looking at solar energy as another renewable option, and the central bank is offering to finance 80 percent of local solar investments. The government has removed duty and sales taxes on solar technology imports. Picture taken on June 18, 2010.  REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro   (PAKISTAN - Tags: ENERGY) - GM1E66J1L1A01

Technicians work on solar panel in power station in Karachi. Image: REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Imran Mukhtar
Freelance Contributor, Thomson Reuters Foundation
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Pakistan's government has proposed to eliminate taxes associated with manufacturing of solar and wind energy equipment in the country, in an effort to boost the production and use of renewable power and overcome power shortages.

A new government budget bill, expected to be approved in parliament within a month, would give renewable energy manufacturers and assemblers in the country a five-year exemption from the taxes.

"Pakistan is paying the heavy cost of an ongoing energy crisis prevailing for the last many years," Finance Minister Asad Umar said last week in a budget speech.

"In this difficult time, the promotion of renewable energy resources like wind and solar has become indispensable."

Only about 5 to 6 percent of the power to Pakistan's national electrical grid currently comes from renewable energy, according to the country's Alternate Energy Development Board (AEDB).

The proposed tax reduction should boost that by encouraging greater local manufacturing of equipment needed for renewable power expansion, said Asad Mahmood, a renewable energy expert with the National Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority, which sits within the Ministry of Energy.

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Remaining Hurdles

But manufacturers said the tax breaks likely would not be sufficient to spur expansion of local renewable energy industries.

Naeem Siddiqui, the chairman of Ebox Systems, which assembles solar panels in Islamabad, said the new tax breaks were good news but Pakistani manufacturers would still struggle compete with tax-free, low-priced imports of foreign-built solar panels and other renewable energy equipment.

"The government has already waived off taxes and duties on the import of renewable energy products, and local manufacturers cannot compete with the low-priced imported items," he said.

Pakistan today imports more than 95 percent of the solar panels and other renewable energy systems it uses, largely from China, said Aamir Hussain, chief executive officer of Tesla PV, one of the largest manufacturers of solar energy products in Pakistan.

"As long as the government will not impose duties on the import of finished products, the local market cannot grow," he said.

Pakistani manufacturers also might need government help in pushing sales of new Pakistani clean energy products abroad, in order to build bigger markets and lower manufacturing costs, Siddiqui said.

Mahmood, of the energy ministry, said he believed the government would also move to cut existing duties on the import of components used in manufacturing finished renewable energy products, in order to help Pakistani manufacturers.

Taxes on those components have pushed up prices of Pakistani-made renewable energy systems, making them harder to sell and leading several companies to the brink of failure, he said.

Local manufacturers should work with the government to determine which components should be manufactured locally and which imported to ensure costs of locally made wind and solar systems are competitive, he said.

Muhammad Abdur Rahman, managing director of Innosol, a company that imports and installs renewable energy systems, said that cheap imports of renewable energy systems from China remain the main barrier to building more such systems in Pakistan.

"The local industry is facing pricing issues because of low-quality solar energy appliances being imported in the country that are very cheap as compared to the local market," he said.

That might be resolved in part by the government starting a certification system for renewable energy products to grade them according to quality, he said.

Amjad Ali Awan, chief executive officer of the Alternate Energy Development Board, said the aim of the new policies was for renewable energy to supply 28 to 30 percent of the country's national electrical grid by 2030.

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Future of the EnvironmentEnergy TransitionClimate Change
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