From a 998-page novel that's largely one continuous sentence, to the follow-up to The Handmaid's Tale, the six books on this year's Booker Prize shortlist were announced this week.

Image: World Economic Forum

The prize is awarded annually for English-language novels published in the UK and Ireland. The winner, decided by a panel of judges, will be announced on October 14.

Here's the 2019 shortlist:

10 Minutes 38 Seconds In This Strange World

The work of Turkish-British author Elif Shafak, it tells the story of a sex worker left for dead in a rubbish bin, in an unflinching exploration of gender-based violence.

Image: Penguin

An Orchestra Of Minorities

The second time Nigerian-born, US-based Chigozie Obioma has made the shortlist. An Orchestra Of Minorities follows a young Nigerian chicken farmer who's driven to become a migrant in Europe by love.

What is the World Economic Forum's Book Club?

The World Economic Forum launched its official Book Club on Facebook in April 2018. Readers worldwide are invited to join and discuss a variety of books, both fiction and non-fiction. It is a private Facebook group dedicated to discussing one book every month.

Each month, we announce a new book on our social media channels. We then publish an extract and begin a chapter-by-chapter discussion with group members. Selected comments and questions are sent to the author, who in return sends us a video response.

Unlike other book clubs, the group features the direct involvement of the authors, giving you - our global audience with members all around the globe - a chance to directly connect with some of the most influential thinkers and experts in the world.

We have featured authors such as Steven Pinker, Elif Shafak, Yuval Noah Harari, and Melinda Gates.

You can join the Book Club here.

Follow us on Twitter here.

Follow us on Instagram here.

Image: Little Brown Book Group

Ducks, Newburyport

At nearly 1,000 pages, Lucy Ellmann's stream-of-consciousness monologue is almost one continuous sentence. It's narrated by an Ohio housewife, reflecting on her life.

Image: Galley Beggar

What is the World Economic Forum's Book Club?

The World Economic Forum launched its official Book Club on Facebook in April 2018. Readers worldwide are invited to join and discuss a variety of books, both fiction and non-fiction. It is a private Facebook group dedicated to discussing one book every month.

Each month, we announce a new book on our social media channels. We then publish an extract and begin a chapter-by-chapter discussion with group members. Selected comments and questions are sent to the author, who in return sends us a video response.

Unlike other book clubs, the group features the direct involvement of the authors, giving you - our global audience with members all around the globe - a chance to directly connect with some of the most influential thinkers and experts in the world.

We have featured authors such as Steven Pinker, Elif Shafak, Yuval Noah Harari, and Melinda Gates.

You can join the Book Club here.

Follow us on Twitter here.

Follow us on Instagram here.

Girl, Woman, Other

Bernardine Evaristo's first Booker-shortlisted novel follows 12 different characters. They're mostly women, black and British and the book explores their lives and struggles.

Image: Penguin

Quichotte

Sir Salman Rushdie is no stranger to the shortlist - he made it in 1983, 1988 and 1995 - and won the award in 1981 for Midnight's Children. His latest, Quichotte, is inspired by Don Quixote and follows an ageing travelling salesman in the US.

Image: Penguin Random House

The Testaments

Margaret Atwood is also a familiar face - she was shortlisted in 1986, 1989, 1996 and 2003, and won in 2000 for The Blind Assassin. The Testaments is her follow-up to The Handmaid's Tale, set 15 years later in the same dystopian state of Gilead.