Geo-Economics and Politics

Corruption costs developing countries $1.26 trillion every year - yet half of EMEA think it's acceptable

Corruption leaves many people far worse off and feeling marginalized.

Corruption leaves many people far worse off and feeling marginalized. Image: Unsplash/Vitaly Taranov

Sean Fleming
Senior Writer, Forum Agenda
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Corruption

  • Corruption is a global problem.
  • It costs both money and lives.
  • International collaboration is the only way to defeat it.

Corruption takes many forms. It is often thought of as a problem that mostly affects developing countries. But while the harm it does is magnified in poorer nations, corruption does not concern itself with national boundaries – it can be unearthed anywhere.

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At the 50th World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos next month, Founder and Executive Chairman Klaus Schwab will launch the Forum's Davos Manifesto. It will state the need to adopt a new economic model, "stakeholder capitalism". And at its heart is a call to fight corruption. That fight has been central to the World Economic Forum's work for many years, and in 2004 it established the Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI).

Corruption affects every country in the world
Corruption takes a toll all over the world

To mark International Anti-Corruption Day 2019, here are seven shocking and damaging recent examples of corruption around the world, as identified by Transparency International.

1. Across the EMEA region (that’s Europe, the Middle East, and Africa) and India almost half of all workers think bribery and corruption are acceptable if there is an economic downturn.

2. Corruption, bribery, theft and tax evasion, and other illicit financial flows cost developing countries $1.26 trillion per year. That’s roughly the combined size of the economies of Switzerland, South Africa and Belgium, and enough money to lift the 1.4 billion people who get by on less than $1.25 a day above the poverty threshold and keep them there for at least six years.

3. The Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index scores 178 countries on their degree of corruption – 10 is the cleanest possible, and 0 indicates endemic corruption. In 2010, around three-quarters of all 178 scored lower than five.

4. As much as $132 billion is lost to corruption every year throughout the European Union’s member states, according to the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs.

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5. Bangladesh is one of the world’s poorer countries. Around one-third of the population say they have been the victims of corruption, and an astonishing 84% of those households who had interacted with different public and private service institutions have been victims of corruption.

6. In war-torn Afghanistan, of the $8 billion donated in recent years, as much as $1 billion has been lost to corruption. Integrity Watch Afghanistan estimates bribe payments — for everything from enrolling in elementary school to getting a permit — exceed $1 billion a year.

7. In one Russian province, if you want to become a police officer you will probably have to pay around $3,000. To get a place in medical school, you will need to part with around $10,000. One consequence of this, according to the International Crisis Group, has been that some people have grown so disaffected that they have become drawn to Islamic extremism.

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