Viet Nam

Everything you need to know about Vietnam’s plan to plant 1 billion trees

The Vietnamese government intends to plant 1 billion trees nationwide by 2025. Image: Michael Tatarski.

Michael Tatarski

Journalist, Freelance

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image of trees planted as part of Vietnam’s plan to plant 1 billion trees by 2025
In April, officials and volunteers planted 23 trees in an unfinished park along the Saigon River in Ho Chi Minh City, part of Vietnam’s plan to plant 1 billion trees by 2025. Most of the trees are slated for planting in urban areas. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of a thirsty tree in Ho Chi Minh City’s dry-season heat
Some of the new trees have started to fade in Ho Chi Minh City’s dry-season heat. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of Nguyen Quang Hoa tending to seedlings at his home outside Hue, in Thua Thien-Hue province
Nguyen Quang Hoa tending to seedlings at his home outside Hue, in Thua Thien-Hue province. Most plantations in the area grow a monocrop of acacia but Hoa plants long-lived native trees among the acacia on his plantation. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of newly planted mangrove trees in Tra Vinh province, part of local tree-planting efforts in the Mekong Delta unrelated to Vietnam’s 1-billion-tree program
Mangroves help protect local communities from the rising sea levels and increasing storms that are resulting from climate change. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of trucks carrying timber on the roads of Thua Thien-Hue province.
Trucks carrying timber are a common sight on the roads of Thua Thien-Hue province. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of a former acacia plantation being prepared for the construction of an expressway near the city of Hue in Thua Thien-Hue province
A former acacia plantation being prepared for the construction of an expressway near the city of Hue in Thua Thien-Hue province. Infrastructure development remains a major driver of tree loss in Vietnam. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of cleared plantation plots alternate with growing acacia next to a reservoir in Huong Tra district.
Areas such as this are counted as forest cover although compared to natural forest they provide far fewer environmental benefits such as carbon storage, wildlife habitat, and protection from erosion. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of Nguyen Quang Hoa, left, and Phan Huu Tan at the latter’s farm with an acacia tree behind them
Nguyen Quang Hoa, left, and Phan Huu Tan at the latter’s farm. The acacia behind them was planted in 2014 and trimmed in 2018. Image: Michael Tatarski
image of acacia at various stages of growth on Phan Huu Tan’s farm
Acacia at various stages of growth on Phan Huu Tan’s farm. Image: Michael Tatarski
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image of a one year-old indigenous tree on Phan Huu Tan’s farm
A one year-old indigenous tree on Phan Huu Tan’s farm. Image: Michael Tatarski
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Related topics:
Viet NamForestsOne Trillion TreesSustainable Development
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