Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Building equitable futures through the Ibero-American Social and Solidarity Economy Network

Picture of attendees at Framework Conference in Mexico City: The Ibero-American Network for the Promotion of Social and Solidarity Economy was formed to foster sustainable economic growth and social justice collectively.

The Ibero-American Network for the Promotion of Social and Solidarity Economy was formed to foster sustainable economic growth and social justice collectively. Image: INAES

Juan Manuel Martinez Louvier
Director-General, Instituto Nacional de la Economia Social (INAES)
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion?
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Fairer Economies

  • Chile, Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Mexico and Spain signed a historic transnational agreement to establish the first Ibero-American Network for the Social and Solidarity Economy.
  • The Ibero-American Network is a joint commitment towards sustainable and equitable development in the region through the social and solidarity economy.
  • The network’s primary purpose is to democratize economic processes of collective production, consumption and savings, alleviating inequalities and prioritizing people over capital.

Following the adoption of the UN Resolution on the Social Economy in April 2023, Chile, Colombia, Brazil, Guatemala, Mexico and Spain have formed the Ibero-American Network for the Promotion of Social and Solidarity Economy to actively shape a collective vision to foster sustainable economic growth and social justice.

Representing a historic milestone for the Ibero-American region, the network was incepted through a pivotal agreement that sets out its goal to promote, encourage, support and strengthen democracy and social justice in the region. The network’s primary focus is on fostering sustainable economic and social development, aligning with the shared commitment sparked by the resolution.

Have you read?

Addressing inequality and environmental challenges

In the face of escalating structural inequalities and environmental challenges, the social and solidarity economy presents a solid alternative where social objectives, solidarity and mutual support are prioritized over profit maximization, in which various organizations already participate.

The Ibero-American network intends to catalyze this economic approach, laying the groundwork for fair trade. Its fundamental purpose is to democratize economic processes of collective production, consumption and savings, alleviating inequalities and prioritizing people over capital.

The international community already recognizes the responsibility to promote the social and solidarity economy as the key to achieving sustainable development and well-being, not only through the resolution but through the commitments of the UN to sustainable development, the International Labour Organization (ILO) for decent work and the European Union’s support for social enterprises and cooperatives, for example.

Regional support for social and solidarity economy

Latin American countries have also pioneered key policies and legal frameworks supporting the social and solidarity economy, such as Ecuador’s Organic Law of the Popular and Solidarity Economy and the Public Sector’s Financial Economy or Bolivia’s Law of Productive, Communitarian and Social Economy.

Brazil established within the Ministry of Labour and Employment the National Secretariat of Solidarity Economy, which provides financial support, training and technical assistance for solidarity economy enterprises, among other initiatives.

The Ibero-American Network for the Promotion of Social and Solidarity Economy will further promote the creation of social enterprises with economic, social and environmental benefits for the communities in the region. Its overarching goal is to consolidate a regional bloc that promotes the social and solidarity economy, establishing conducive conditions for developing fair trade that addresses deep-rooted structural inequalities.

Loading...

Goals of the Ibero-American network

The network will be guided by its statutes that align with the principles of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the ILO and the UN General Assembly representing these key missions:

  • Promote the development of the social and solidarity economy, democratizing economic processes of production, marketing, consumption and collective savings.
  • Prioritize traditionally excluded sectors and reaffirm commitment to communities by promoting a social and solidarity economy as a model for economic inclusion.
  • Contribute to the political will of governments by influencing legislatures, national development strategies and public policies.

An urgent and global need

Cementing the union, representatives from the network’s six member countries gathered in Mexico City for the first Framework Conference, which took place between 29 and 31 January 2024 and was convened by the Mexican government’s National Institute of Social Economy.

During this event, Minister Yolanda Díaz, the second vice president of the government of Spain, highlighted that the social and solidarity economy was not just of regional importance but was an important global vision. The current economic model is inadequate for the weight of today’s problems, said Joel Hernández García, undersecretary for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico, as he advocated for more events to create fairer and more fraternal societies.

The current integration of countries is a first step to find common instruments to strengthen the economy of the people, said Juan Manuel Martínez Louvier, the Director of the institute and a recently awarded social public innovator at the World Economic Forum.

There is no more urgent time to confront the dominant economic model and build a social state with collective interests, concluded Jesús Ramírez Cuevas, spokesperson for the Presidency of Mexico, adding that Mexico is immersed in the process of change. He called on more countries to join this movement, highlighting the importance of building tangible and real connections through the Ibero-American Network.

Loading...

Unlocking the social and solidarity economy’s potential

This significant step forward is not limited to creating an economic network but projects itself as a comprehensive political, social and community initiative.

The Ibero-American Network for the Promotion of Social and Solidarity Economy emerges as a sign of hope and a collective commitment to sustainable, supportive and equitable development in the region.

While these initiatives are encouraging signs, unlocking the full potential of the global social economy requires more public support, private investment and partnerships. The recent UN resolution on Social Economy marks a crucial step towards building international momentum. The next imperative step is for all member states to commit and implement these visionary initiatives.

Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

How focused giving can unlock billions and catapult women’s wealth

Mark Muckerheide

May 21, 2024

1:40

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum