Partnership for Health System Sustainability and Resilience

In collaboration with London School of Economics and AstraZeneca

An initiative to make sure health systems withstand future crises.

The Partnership for Health System Sustainability and Resilience (PHSSR) has been initiated by the London School of Economics (LSE), the World Economic Forum (WEF) and AstraZeneca, motivated by a shared commitment to improving population health, through and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.

The pandemic has tested our health systems to, and beyond their limits. We could - and should - have been better prepared for this crisis. It has exposed long-standing fault lines in health systems that were already straining to meet increasing population needs and bridge health inequalities. Change is needed to build health systems that are both resilient to crises and sustainable in the face of long-term stresses.

From new models of care, to innovative financing mechanisms and breakthrough technologies, PHSSR aims to make change happen, by identifying transferrable solutions with the greatest potential, and supporting their adoption to deliver better health and better care for all.

The pilot phase of the PHSSR programme has now been completed and teams of expert researchers in eight countries conducted rapid reviews of health system sustainability and resilience.

Planning for the next phase of the initiative is now underway, and further details will be published in due course.

The PHSSR Pilot


Find out how we piloted a framework to analyse the sustainability and resilience of health systems

Country-specific analysis, transferrable insights

Meet the specialist teams who analysed health system resilience and sustainability in eight pilot countries

The foundations of a broad-based partnership

Our steering committee provides expert counsel and strategic direction to the project in our dynamic environment

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