In pictures: children around the world display their lockdown art

Jemima Christa-Faelist Tanamal, 6, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that she drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, while standing by her grandparents house in Bekasi, Indonesia, April 21, 2020. Jemima drew herself and her little brother going for a picnic with their grandparents. "I don't like to stay at home, boring," said Jemima. "Once I can go outside, I will go to the mini-market for bubble gum first. I like to go to school, because I can play together with my friends. I will hug my friends and teachers when I go back to school later and say 'I miss you teacher, I miss you friend' to them." REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan      SEARCH "CORONAVIRUS DRAWING" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.   REFILE - CLARIFYING INFORMATION - RC2BAG9LYF2Z
Children are drawing the things and people they miss most.
Image: REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan
  • Confined to their homes by COVID-19 lockdowns, children around the world are drawing and painting the things they miss most.
  • School friends and grandparents are pictured along with football matches and green spaces.
  • For some it’s a chance to celebrate their heroes and the ones they love.
  • For others, their art is a way of expressing their fears about the pandemic.

Children have been some of the hardest hit by lockdown restrictions, which have seen at least a third of the world’s population confined to their homes. Unable to go to school, see their friends or go to playgrounds, many young people have been drawing and painting the things they are missing most – as well as what scares them.

From school friends and football matches to loneliness and the pandemic itself, their artwork reveals the people and things that are on the minds of the children kept indoors by the fight against coronavirus. Here, they explain the thoughts and feelings behind their lockdown art.

Matilda Soto Quilenan, 6, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that she drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as she stands on the roof of her house, in Santiago, Chile, April 20, 2020. Matilda drew herself and her friend Ema from school, who she said she misses a lot.
Matilda Soto Quilenan, 6, from Santiago, Chile.
Image: REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado

Missing a friend: Matilda Soto Quilenan, aged six, from Santiago, Chile, drew a picture of herself with her school friend Ema. “I miss going to the park, eating ice-cream and riding my scooter,” Matilda says. “I’ve felt sad because I can’t go out to play. When I get bored, I occupy my imagination to draw, I can be an artist. I’m happy with that. But sometimes I get angry because the drawings come out too ugly.”

What is the World Economic Forum doing about the coronavirus outbreak?

Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic requires global cooperation among governments, international organizations and the business community, which is at the centre of the World Economic Forum’s mission as the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation.

Since its launch on 11 March, the Forum’s COVID Action Platform has brought together 1,667 stakeholders from 1,106 businesses and organizations to mitigate the risk and impact of the unprecedented global health emergency that is COVID-19.

The platform is created with the support of the World Health Organization and is open to all businesses and industry groups, as well as other stakeholders, aiming to integrate and inform joint action.

As an organization, the Forum has a track record of supporting efforts to contain epidemics. In 2017, at our Annual Meeting, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was launched – bringing together experts from government, business, health, academia and civil society to accelerate the development of vaccines. CEPI is currently supporting the race to develop a vaccine against this strand of the coronavirus.

Ilhan Ruvic, 5, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, by a window at his home in Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, April 19, 2020.
Ilhan Ruvic, 5, from Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Image: REUTERS/ Dado Ruvic

My heroes: Ilhan Ruvic, aged five, from Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, says: “I drew firefighters because they are heroes. I used to draw numbers and letters before isolation... and now I watch a lot of 911 TV series and that is mostly what I draw.”

Sofiat Kolawole, 8, Olatunji Adebayo, 11, and Amira Akanbi 11, pose for a photograph while holding pictures that they drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as they stand in front of their house in Lagos, Nigeria, April 18, 2020. Sofiat who drew her school said:
Sofiat Kolawole, 8, Olatunji Adebayo, 11, and Amira Akanbi 11 from Lagos, Nigeria.
Image: REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

School blues: Sofiat Kolawole, 8, Olatunji Adebayo, 11, and Amira Akanbi, 11, with their pictures at home in Lagos, Nigeria. Sofiat, who drew her school, says: “What I draw now is different from what I normally draw because I miss my school. The lockdown has made me angry.” Olatunji drew a football and says: “I miss playing football with my friends. I feel sad about the lockdown.” Amira drew her teacher and says: “I miss my school.”

Sandithi Illeperuma, 14, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that she drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as she stands in front of her home in Colombo, Sri Lanka, April 17, 2020.
Sandithi Illeperuma, 14 from Colombo, Sri Lanka.
Image: REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte

Feeling lonely: Sandithi Illeperuma, aged 14, from Colombo, Sri Lanka, says: “Before the lockdown, I used to draw fun and creative stuff. But after the lockdown, I started to draw the things I missed the most.” Sandithi drew a picture of a girl sitting apart, wearing a face mask, with dancers in the background. She says of the lockdown: “It has made me feel very lonely because I’m an only child.”

Bashierah Moos, 5, and Hanaa Moos, 9, pose for a photograph while holding pictures that they drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as they stand by a window at their house in Cape Town, South Africa, April 19, 2020. Bashierah drew a picture of a rainbow and Hanaa said
Bashierah Moos, 5, and Hanaa Moos, 9, from Cape Town, South Africa.
Image: REUTERS/Sumaya Hisham

Over the rainbow: Bashierah Moos, aged five, and Hanaa Moos, aged nine, at their home in Cape Town, South Africa. Bashierah drew a rainbow, while Hanaa says: “I drew my family next to an ice-cream truck because I miss going out. I feel sad because I can’t see my friends and go to school.”

Mila Brusovani, 4, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that she drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as she stands in her home in Tel Aviv, Israel, April 17, 2020. Mila did a painting of the coronavirus.
Mila Brusovani, 4, Tel Aviv, Israel.
Image: REUTERS/Corinna Kern

Painting the virus: Mila Brusovani, aged four, from Tel Aviv, Israel did a painting of the coronavirus. “Corona is kind of a crown that has spikes and is round,” she says. “I made plans with my mother and it ruined everything. We planned to go on a trip with Jan (my little brother), with my bicycle, and in the end we didn’t go because of corona.”

Cristofer Lucas Reyes, 7, poses for a photograph while holding a picture that he drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as he stands in front of his home in Havana, Cuba, April 20, 2020. Cristofer drew himself and his mum inside a house wearing masks while his father, who is a doctor, is outside going to work. There's a sign outside saying: Forbidden coronavirus and also some virus falling from sky.
Cristofer Lucas Reyes, 7, from Havana Cuba.
Image: REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini

Harsh reality: Cristofer Lucas Reyes, aged seven, from Havana, Cuba, drew himself and his mother inside their house wearing masks while his father, who is a doctor, is outside going to work. Coronavirus falls from the sky and there’s a "Virus Forbidden" sign outside the house. “Before, I used to draw abstract things, but now I draw the reality of what is going on,” he says.

Marie Lou Belenyesi, 4, and Paolo Belenyesi, 9, pose for a photograph while holding pictures that they drew during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as they stand by the entrance to their home in Brussels, Belgium, April 19, 2020. Marie Lou drew her mom and said she misses her grandmother the most. Paolo drew himself in a farm. He said he missed climbing, friends and his grandparents the most.
Marie Lou Belenyesi, 4, and Paolo Belenyesi, 9 fromm Brussels, Belgium.
Image: REUTERS/Johanna Geron

Missing their grandparents: Marie Lou Belenyesi, aged four, and her nine-year-old brother Paolo in Brussels, Belgium. Marie Lou drew her mother and said that she misses her grandmother the most. Paolo drew himself in a farm. He misses climbing, friends and his grandparents the most. “Quarantine is a bit boring because I don’t know what to do,” he says.