Geo-Economics and Politics

Is Africa winning the war against corruption?

Arwen Armbrecht
Writer and social media producer, Freelance
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Corruption

Corruption is getting worse in sub-Saharan Africa, according to a new poll by Transparency International and the research firm Afrobarometer.

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Africa’s two largest economies, South Africa and Nigeria, are home to two of the three most pessimistic sets of respondents saying corruption is on the rise.

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The police and business executives are seen as most corrupt, followed by government officials. Religious leaders are seen as least corrupt.

 

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Of the 43,000 Africans surveyed, 22% reported that they had paid a bribe to a public official in the past 12 months.

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Amongst a downbeat set of findings, Transparency International nevertheless see room for optimism: “There are a few countries in which citizens see low levels of corruption in their public institutions and see corruption as on the wane in their own country. The views of citizens in Botswana, Burkina Faso, Lesotho and Senegal are particularly positive.”

Author: Donald Armbrecht is a freelance writer and social media producer.

Image: Members of the Kenyan civil society organisation hold a chain during a demonstration along the streets of the capital Nairobi. REUTERS/Noor Khamis

 

 

 

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