Climate Change

The Arctic just had the warmest winter on record. The repercussions will be global

Image: REUTERS/Bob Strong

Gail Whiteman

Director, Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business, Lancaster University

Jeremy Wilkinson

Sea Ice Physicist, British Antarctic Survey

Share:

Our Impact
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Climate Change is affecting economies, industries and global issues
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale

Stay up to date:

Climate Change

Plot line from Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB016) showing the air temp from the top sensor that is about 2 feet above the snow pack
Colour plot of all the sensors that were above the snow pack
Image: National Snow and Ice Data Center
This shows the September Ice extent in 1979 (upper blue), 2007 (lower blue: second lowest year), 2012 (dotted green: lowest year) and 2016 (red: up to early September 2016 only). The 1981 to 2010 average is in dark grey. The grey area around the average line shows the two standard deviation range of the data. Image: National Snow and Ice Data Center
Monthly March ice extent for 1979 to 2016 shows a decline of 2.7% per decade Image: National Snow and Ice Data Center

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:

Climate ChangeArcticFuture of the Environment

Share:

Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

The UN just declared a new human right
About Us
Events
Media
Partners & Members
Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2022 World Economic Forum