Climate Change

Maersk, the global shipping giant, takes the biggest leap towards carbon neutral shipping

Efforts towards carbon neutral shipping is will be a shot in the arm for climate change efforts

Efforts towards carbon neutral shipping is will be a shot in the arm for climate change efforts Image: REUTERS/Michael Kooren

Nikolaj Skydsgaard
Danish Correspondent, Reuters
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Climate Change

  • Danish company A.P. Moller-Maersk has committed to becoming a carbon neutral shipping company by 2050.
  • It will team up with other industry leaders to set up a research center to reduce carbon emissions in the shipping industry.
  • The centre will be based in Denmark and combine the knowledge from industry experts, academia and regulators on carbon neutral shipping.
  • Shipping carries around 80% of global trade and is directly responsible for 3% of worldwide emissions.

The world’s largest container shipper, A.P. Moller-Maersk MAERSKB.CO, will team up with industry majors to set up a research centre in Denmark with the aim of reducing carbon emissions in the shipping industry.

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Carbon neutral shipping by 2050

Denmark’s Maersk, a global shipping giant that aims to be carbon-neutral by 2050, said on the 24th June, the research centre would combine knowledge from industry, academia and regulators towards “decarbonizing” the industry by developing carbon-neutral fuel and technologies.

The shipping industry, which carries around 80% of global trade and accounts for around 3% of global carbon emissions, pledged last year to have ships and marine fuels with zero carbon emissions ready by 2030.

The move towards carbon neutral shipping would be funded by Maersk’s majority owner, the A.P. Moller Foundation, which has donated 400 million Danish crowns ($60.36 million) towards building the Copenhagen-based research hub set to initially employ 100 people, Maersk said.

Denmark, which has one of the world’s most ambitious climate goals of cutting emissions by 70% by 2030, is home to renewable energy majors like wind farm developer Orsted and turbine maker Vestas.

“With this donation, The A. P. Moller Foundation wishes to support the efforts to solve the climate issue in global shipping,” chairman of the foundation’s board, Ane Uggla, said.

The centre, which would be an independent nonprofit organization, is founded by shipping firms Maersk and NYK Lines as well as Siemens Energy, MAN Energy Solutions, ABS, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and trading conglomerate Cargill Inc. It's the first big step towards carbon neutral shipping in the industry.

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Climate ChangeEnergy TransitionTrade and Investment
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