Climate Change

Green infrastructure can protect ports from growing environmental risks. Here's how 

One of the largest green infrastructure plans that could become a model for ports around the world is emerging from Galveston Bay, Texas. Image: Rogers Partners

Jim Blackburn

Co-Director, SSPEED Center, Professor of environmental law, civil and environmental engineering, Rice University

Charles Penland

P.E., Leed A.P., Managing Principal and Director of Business Development – Infrastructure, Walter P Moore Engineering

Blake Eskew

PE, President, Transition Strategies

Rob Rogers

FAIA, Founder, Rogers Partners Architects and Urban Designers

Lisa Chamberlain

Communication Lead, Urban Transformation, World Economic Forum

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The Ship Channel at the Houston port will be widened to safely accommodate larger ships as they move in and out of the bay. Image: Rogers Partners

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