Health and Healthcare Systems

COVID-19: What you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic on 1 June

Filipino artist Leeroy New poses with a makeshift mask he designed with recycled materials as he adapts to the effects of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in the art industry, in his studio in Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines, May 28, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RC2RXG9OJBH5

Filipino artist Leeroy New poses with a makeshift mask he designed with recycled materials as he adapts to the effects of coronavirus. Image: REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Linda Lacina
Digital Editor, World Economic Forum
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COVID-19

  • This daily round-up brings you a selection of the latest news updates on the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, as well as tips and tools to help you stay informed and protected.
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What is the World Economic Forum doing about the coronavirus outbreak?

1. How COVID-19 is affecting the globe

  • Confirmed coronavirus cases have surpassed 6.1 million worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University. More than 372,000 people have died from the virus, while over 2.6 million have recovered.
  • Miles-long lines for free food in Geneva show impact to undocumented and underpaid workers.
  • Scientists warn against reopening measures in England as lockdown eased.
  • Spain reports lowest rate of new cases in 3 months.
  • Cases in New York City top 200,000.
  • Economic indicators show grim time for Asian factories.
 Number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in the last seven days by country, territory or area, 25 May to 31 May
Number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in the last seven days by country, territory or area, 25 May to 31 May Image: World Health Organization

2. Pope: People more important than the economy
For the first time in several months, Pope Francis addressed the public, stressing how countries should prioritize as they reopen.

“Healing people, not saving (money) to help the economy (is important), healing people, who are more important than the economy,” Francis said.

Pope Francis leads the Regina Coeli prayer from his window in the newly reopened St. Peter's Square after months of closure due to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Vatican, May 31, 2020. Vatican Media/­Handout via REUTERS    ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. - RC2MZG982RYB
Pope Francis leads the Regina Coeli prayer from his window in the newly reopened St. Peter's Square after months of closure. Image: Vatican Media via REUTERS

3. Britain eases lockdown, but is it too soon?

English schools reopened on Monday for the first time since they were shut 10 weeks ago, but many parents planned to keep children at home amid fears ministers were moving too fast.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from COVID-19, and many people are worried that it is happening too soon, including a number of scientists who advise the government who have warned it could lead to a second spike in infections.

4. Mythbusting can strengthen false beliefs
COVID-19 mythbusting may have had limited impact because familiarity can strengthen false beliefs, according to an article published by the Conversation. Studies have shown that people who have read 'myth vs fact' articles remember which items are true and which are false right after reading such pieces. But several days later, people can accept false ideas as true.

Impact of Myth-busting sites
Facts: Earth is not flat; Moon is not cheese. Image: The Conversation

A study by health economists finds that paid sick leave could help slow the spread of diseases such as coronavirus. The study examined mandates enacted by state and local governments in the US between 2005 and 2018. Their research found that workers were more likely to stay home when sick with such measures in place, helping to contain illness. Women and minorities, who often work in industries that don't traditionally offer paid sick leave particularly benefit.

COVID-19 brought many policies around the globe to prevent the virus' spread including policies such as the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in the US. That policy, which went into effect April 1 for small- and medium-sized small businesses, was the first congressionally-passed bill providing Paid Sick Leave for employees. Bills like that, wrote the researchers, will be key to containing the virus, especially as businesses reopen.

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