• This daily round-up brings you a selection of the latest news updates on the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, as well as tips and tools to help you stay informed and protected.

What is the World Economic Forum doing about the coronavirus outbreak?

Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic requires global cooperation among governments, international organizations and the business community, which is at the centre of the World Economic Forum’s mission as the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation.

Since its launch on 11 March, the Forum’s COVID Action Platform has brought together 1,667 stakeholders from 1,106 businesses and organizations to mitigate the risk and impact of the unprecedented global health emergency that is COVID-19.

The platform is created with the support of the World Health Organization and is open to all businesses and industry groups, as well as other stakeholders, aiming to integrate and inform joint action.

As an organization, the Forum has a track record of supporting efforts to contain epidemics. In 2017, at our Annual Meeting, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was launched – bringing together experts from government, business, health, academia and civil society to accelerate the development of vaccines. CEPI is currently supporting the race to develop a vaccine against this strand of the coronavirus.

1. How COVID-19 is affecting the globe

 Number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in the last seven days by country, territory or area, 25 May to 31 May
Number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in the last seven days by country, territory or area, 25 May to 31 May
Image: World Health Organization

2. Pope: People more important than the economy
For the first time in several months, Pope Francis addressed the public, stressing how countries should prioritize as they reopen.

“Healing people, not saving (money) to help the economy (is important), healing people, who are more important than the economy,” Francis said.

Pope Francis leads the Regina Coeli prayer from his window in the newly reopened St. Peter's Square after months of closure due to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at the Vatican, May 31, 2020. Vatican Media/­Handout via REUTERS    ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. - RC2MZG982RYB
Pope Francis leads the Regina Coeli prayer from his window in the newly reopened St. Peter's Square after months of closure.
Image: Vatican Media via REUTERS

3. Britain eases lockdown, but is it too soon?

English schools reopened on Monday for the first time since they were shut 10 weeks ago, but many parents planned to keep children at home amid fears ministers were moving too fast.

Britain has one of the highest death rates from COVID-19, and many people are worried that it is happening too soon, including a number of scientists who advise the government who have warned it could lead to a second spike in infections.

4. Mythbusting can strengthen false beliefs
COVID-19 mythbusting may have had limited impact because familiarity can strengthen false beliefs, according to an article published by the Conversation. Studies have shown that people who have read 'myth vs fact' articles remember which items are true and which are false right after reading such pieces. But several days later, people can accept false ideas as true.

Impact of Myth-busting sites
Facts: Earth is not flat; Moon is not cheese.
Image: The Conversation

A study by health economists finds that paid sick leave could help slow the spread of diseases such as coronavirus. The study examined mandates enacted by state and local governments in the US between 2005 and 2018. Their research found that workers were more likely to stay home when sick with such measures in place, helping to contain illness. Women and minorities, who often work in industries that don't traditionally offer paid sick leave particularly benefit.

COVID-19 brought many policies around the globe to prevent the virus' spread including policies such as the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in the US. That policy, which went into effect April 1 for small- and medium-sized small businesses, was the first congressionally-passed bill providing Paid Sick Leave for employees. Bills like that, wrote the researchers, will be key to containing the virus, especially as businesses reopen.