Space

NASA has released new photos of the Apollo 11 moon landing

The Apollo 11 mission landed on the Moon on July 20th, 1969. Image: REUTERS/Neil Armstrong/NASA/Handout

Kate Whiting

Senior Writer, Formative Content

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Buzz Aldrin leaves the lunar module Eagle and prepares to walk on the moon. This photo was taken by his fellow astronaut Neil Armstrong, with a 70 mm lunar surface camera. Image: NASA
Buzz Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon near a leg of the lunar module during the Apollo 11 Image: NASA
This photograph showing the solar corona was taken from the Apollo 11 spacecraft before reaching the moon – the dark disc between the spacecraft and the sun. Image: NASA
After exploring the moon's surface, Armstrong and Aldrin returned to the Eagle to prepare for liftoff. The lunar module had its own propulsion system, and an engine to lift it off the moon and send it towards the orbiting command module. In this photograph, its ascent is seen with the Earth in the background, just before the rendezvous with the command module. Image: NASA

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