• Milan wants to avoid going back to its polluted ways when the COVID-19 lockdown is lifted.
  • The city is planning to build 35km of new cycle routes and to give pedestrians more space by widening pavements.
  • Even the metro will get new measures to allow passengers to practise social distancing.
  • Work on this ambitious transformation could start as early as May.

Politicians are fond of talking about the new normal in a world changed by coronavirus. But Milan is actively looking beyond the end of lockdown with plans for a much cleaner city.

The city’s councilor for mobility, Marco Granelli, says the Strade Aperte (Open Streets) scheme will reduce pollution and allow cyclists and pedestrians to move freely through the often choked city. Last year, Italy’s environmental regulator named Milan as the nation’s sixth most polluted city.

Granelli says the lockdown in Milan, the capital of Lombardy – the province worst hit by Italy’s COVID-19 epidemic – is a chance to look to the future and plan a city where people can enjoy living and working free from traffic pollution.

What is the World Economic Forum doing to improve the future of cities?

Cities represent humanity’s greatest achievements – and greatest challenges. From inequality to air pollution, poorly designed cities are feeling the strain as 68% of the world’s population is predicted to live in urban areas by 2050.

The World Economic Forum’s Platform for Shaping the Future of Urban Transformation supports a number of projects designed to make cities cleaner and more inclusive, and to improve citizens’ quality of life:

  • Creating a net zero carbon future for cities
    The Forum’s Net Zero Carbon Cities programme brings together businesses from 10 sectors, with city, regional and national government leaders who are implementing a toolbox of solutions to accelerate progress towards a net-zero future.
  • Helping citizens stay healthy
    The Forum is working with cities around the world to create innovative urban partnerships, to help residents find a renewed focus on their physical and mental health.
  • Developing smart city governance
    Cities, local governments, companies, start-ups, research institutions and non-profit organizations are testing and implementing global norms and policy standards to ensure that data is used safely and ethically.
  • Closing the global infrastructure investment gap
    Development banks, governments and businesses are finding new ways to work together to mobilize private sector capital for infrastructure financing.

Contact us for more information on how to get involved.

He also believes the scheme will help restart the city’s local economy.

“We worked for years to reduce car use. If everybody drives a car, there is no space for people, there is no space to move, there is no space for commercial activities outside the shops,” Granelli told the UK’s Guardian newspaper.

“Of course, we want to reopen the economy, but we think we should do it on a different basis from before. We think we have to reimagine Milan in the new situation.

“We have to get ready; that’s why it’s so important to defend even a part of the economy, to support bars, artisans and restaurants. When it is over, the cities that still have this kind of economy will have an advantage, and Milan wants to be in that category.”

italy milan italy public transport transit bicycle ike riding pedal green environment Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
The coronavirus lockdown has transformed Milan into a bike- and pedestrian-friendly city.
Image: REUTERS/Flavio Lo Scalzo

Freedom to cycle and walk

The Strade Aperte plan is to create 35 kilometres of new cycle routes across the city, widen pavements for pedestrians and reduce parking spaces to deter drivers from entering the city centre. And Granelli told Radio Lombardy that work could start as soon as next month.

He also announced plans to make the city’s metro system suitable for social distancing, by marking out spaces in subway cars and stations that must be left empty, even in rush hour.

In January, the city’s population had hit a 30-year high. Mayor Beppe Sala said that Brexit was a factor, with Londoners moving there for work and Italians returning home.

Regarded as Italy’s commercial powerhouse, central Milan is a compact city of 1.4 million people. Before the coronavirus lockdown an almost equal number (1.37 million) used the city’s metro every day, although that figure included commuters from outside the city.

italy cities future italian italia milan subway public transport transit Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
Milan’s popular subway system will feature social distancing measures in the city’s planned new scheme.
Image: Statista

The average commute in Milan and Lombardy is just under 8km, according to the Global Public Transport Report 2019. Only 2% of people commute daily by scooter or bicycle. The city already has a congestion charge zone which also bans the most polluting vehicles from the centre.

Since the coronavirus lockdown started, public transport use in Milan and the Lombardy region has declined by over 88%.

The city’s main shopping street, Corso Buenos Aires, is earmarked to be the first to receive the new traffic reduction measures, with work due to start there at the beginning of May. Officials say the remainder of the work will be completed by the end of the summer.