COVID-19

Even mild cases of COVID-19 can leave a mark on the brain, study show

The impact on the brain is the same as for those who experience mild and severe cases of COVID-19. Image: UNSPLASH/Medakit Ltd

Jessica Bernard

Associate Professor, Texas A&M University

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'Some people with COVID-19 have experienced either the loss of, or a reduction in, their sense of smell'. Image: UNSPLASH/ Battlecreek Coffee Roasters

'Brain images from a 35-year-old and an 85-year-old. Orange arrows show the thinner gray matter in the older individual. Green arrows point to areas where there is more space filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) due to reduced brain volume. The purple circles highlight the brains’ ventricles, which are filled with CSF. In older adults, these fluid-filled areas are much larger.' Image: The Conversation/Jessica Bernard, CC BY-ND
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