Mustapha Mokass

Co-Founder, Regenopolis

Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Atlas Partners, an impact-driven company in renewable energy and off-grid solar-powered desalination technology to improve affordable water access in Europe, MENA and Africa. Impact investor: in technologies impacting positively the climate - Immersion4 technology providing innovative energy efficiency solution for datacenters; in technologies generating social impact - HeathKey; leading post C-19 fast & safe economic restart solution based on Blockchain-based Digital Immunity Certification: www.covid-pass.tech; served for several years at the World Bank Group and United Nations Environment Programme focused on structuring innovative blended finance for adaptation and mitigation; 3 years as an adviser for sustainability finance to governments; focused on modernizing the government’s approach to frontier markets by boosting private capital and public investments; was instrumental in setting a multi-donors/investors coalition for climate finance action. Was member of the founding team that grew Amanar firm from a start-up in eco-tourism to leading social impact business with more than 160 employees in the Atlas, Morocco. Young Global Leader (YGL), World Economic Forum. Co-Founder of the YGL Initiative Regeneration Hubs, Winner of YGL Impact Lab 2016 - supporting green projects developers to reach bankability threshold. Board member at Givedirectly US NGO and Care, Morocco. Former Climate Finance Consultant; advised assets managers, private equity, banking, and consumer product firms in the US, Europe and Africa. Professor at Anant University for Climate Action, India and regular public speaker at global conferences on SDGs, technologies and climate finance. MSc in Urban and Environmental Engineering; Master, HEC Paris Business School; EE, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and Oxford Said Business School.

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