Appetite for Change – 4 New Ideas to Incentivize Change in How We Produce and Consume Food

Published
17 Jan 2020
2020
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Alem Tedeneke, Media Lead, World Economic Forum; +1 646 204-9191; ated@weforum.org

· Greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced by around 30% of projected global agricultural emissions in 2050 through recommended interventions

· New World Economic Forum Report shows how 7.7 billion people can be incentivized to transform the way they produce and consume food

· Report outlines four pathways for incentivizing food systems transformation: repurposing public investment and policies, business model innovations, institutional investments and consumer behavioural change

· Read the full report here

New York, 17 January 2020 – A new report by the World Economic Forum, Incentivizing Food Systems Transformation, highlights the role of incentives to effectively shift behaviour of 7.7 billion people who produce and consume food through four pathways – at the policy, business, investment and consumer levels – and presents a roadmap for change.

Today, one in five children suffer from stunting and two in five adults are overweight. Current unsustainable agricultural practices could lead to the degradation of 95% of the world's land. Meanwhile, food loss and waste cost the global economy almost $940 billion annually.

Reducing these environmental and health costs requires a fundamental shift in how food is produced. This includes the practices of over 500 million smallholder farmers and the consumption patterns of the global population.

Several transitions - including a healthier diet, sustainable supply chains, inclusive livelihoods, and efficient production systems - are needed to truly transform food systems that meet the needs of people and the planet. The right set of incentives can overcome challenges preventing stakeholders from making a shift, as well as fund ongoing economic costs.

Four Pathways For Incentivizing Food Systems Transformation
Four Pathways For Incentivizing Food Systems Transformation
Image: McKinsey & Company

The new analysis illustrates how the four incentive pathways can reduce agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by around 30% of projected global agricultural emissions in 2050 - which is equivalent to more than five times the annual emissions of all aircraft combined. The report also estimates that if all the available GHG-efficient production practices were implemented at full scale, the global food system could see cost savings of more than $50 billion annually.

The four pathways are interconnected, and realigning incentives will need calculated trade-offs between the numerous diverse-yet-connected outcomes in food systems along with customization based on local contexts. The report provides a roadmap with five action areas for the global community to mobilize stakeholders for a decade of action to meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The report, produced in collaboration with McKinsey & Company, is part of the Food Systems Initiative under the Platform for Global Public Goods of the World Economic Forum, which is mobilizing and supporting the individual, institutional and network-level leadership required to shape the future of food systems.

Over the past decade, the initiative has established a common agenda and platform that now enable more than 700 organizations to collaborate and learn, resulting in multistakeholder partnership initiatives in more than 25 countries.

Impact of agriculture on climate change
Image: McKinsey & Company

“As the world prepares for the important milestone of the UN Food Systems Summit in 2021, it is our hope that this incentives report will inspire more stakeholders to take action to develop a collective leadership agenda on food systems,” said Dominic Waughray, Managing Director and Head of the Platform for Global Public Goods of the World Economic Forum.

“We urgently need to change the way we produce and consume food so we can feed everyone in the world while raising incomes, improving health and nutrition and protecting the planet. This report highlights four pathways for transforming food systems – at the policy, business, investment and consumer levels – recognizing the need for solutions tailored to country contexts. It is a welcome contribution as countries and their partners work to shift global and local food landscapes toward better development outcomes”, said Laura Tuck, Vice President, Sustainable Development, The World Bank.

“The impact of agriculture on climate change cannot be overstated – it’s both a key contributor and a promising solution. This report highlights some of the novel approaches that will be needed to ensure that agriculture takes a leading role in tackling this most complex risk facing society today, particularly in the areas of finance and risk management”, said Alison Martin, CEO for EMEA and Bank Distribution, Zurich Insurance Group.

“We need to urgently change how we produce, process and consume food today. There is a historic opportunity to transform agri-food systems, which are essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The UN will convene the Food Systems Summit in 2021 to galvanize a collective leadership agenda that will be essential to deliver on food security, farmers’ livelihood and rural development, and take better care of our natural resources. Realigning incentives will be an important approach in such a transformation journey”, said Dr. Qu Dongyu, Director General, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations.

The World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting brings together over 3,000 global leaders from politics, government, civil society, academia, the arts and culture as well as the media. Convening under the theme, Stakeholders for a Cohesive and Sustainable World, participants will focus on defining new models for building sustainable and inclusive societies in a plurilateral world.

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All opinions expressed are those of the author. The World Economic Forum Blog is an independent and neutral platform dedicated to generating debate around the key topics that shape global, regional and industry agendas.
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