Global Call to Boost Diversity of Genomic Medicine

Published
21 Jul 2020
2020
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Amanda Russo, Public Engagement, World Economic Forum, +41 79 392 6898, arus@weforum.org

  • The COVID-19 pandemic exposed existing global inequities in health systems and gaps in the understanding of how disease may affect populations and individuals due to genetic differences.
  • Accelerating the collection and use of genomic and genetic data from populations in low- and middle- income countries could fill knowledge gaps, spur medical discoveries and lead to more targeted and appropriate care for those populations, but introduces significant risks of expanding inequities by primarily benefiting outside parties.
  • To address these risks and prompt action, the World Economic Forum collaborated with 30 global leaders to develop a forward-looking, scalable policy framework and set of six ethical tensions. Policy-makers, business leaders, researchers and others can leverage and adapt these for use in a local context.
  • Read the white paper and learn more about the Forum’s Leapfrogging with Precision Medicine Project.

San Francisco, USA, 21 July 2020 – The COVID-19 pandemic provides another painful example of the healthcare disparities experienced among ethnic populations. These disparities are not unique to COVID-19, but are the latest consequence of longstanding gaps in population understanding, inclusion in research and access to targeted care.

As the industry moves towards more precise disease screenings, diagnostics and treatments thanks to genomic research, these disparities will grow. Analysis found 78% of people in genome-wide association studies are of European descent. Additionally, researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital found data from the UK Biobank had a 4.5 times higher prediction accuracy for people of European ancestry than those of African ancestry, and two times higher accuracy than those of East Asian ancestry.

“The lack of diversity in research studies is leading to blind spots,” said Elissa Prichep, Project Lead, World Economic Forum. “Translated to the clinic, this means non-white minority populations may receive less accurate preventative screenings, less reliable diagnostics, less targeted treatments.”

To support policy-makers, scientists, research participants and others in developing approaches that will lead to more inclusive genomic research, a new World Economic Forum policy framework can help unlock data and safeguard against the harms that can transpire when genomic data is used unchecked.

This work was developed in collaboration with more than 30 global leaders and written from a “future of healthcare” perspective to address the unique and challenging issues raised with the use of genomic data, beyond those that arise with use of physical samples. The focus on emerging economies is intended to ensure consideration of differing perspectives and needs informed by these countries’ diverse historical, societal and cultural contexts.

“A deeper understanding of the genetic diversity across populations will transform healthcare research, promote tailored healthcare delivery and reduce the disease burden across the African continent,” said Thomas Kariuki, Director of Programmes, The African Academy of Sciences. “To this end, the World Economic Forum’s white paper elevates critical policy and ethical considerations in protecting individuals and ensuring equitability in international collaborations.”

“Advances in genomics research are accelerating the medical breakthroughs that will improve health for all people," said Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes for Health. "However, it is important to remember that the data driving these advances begins with human volunteers who consent to providing it for research. This whitepaper encourages greater consideration of the perspective of research participants, and provides tools to help policy makers and scientific leaders navigate the important ethical and societal issues associated with genomic research.”

The white paper includes a scalable policy framework in categories of consent, data privacy, data access and benefit sharing, which offers 21 policy principles including autonomy, accountability, dignity and cooperation. The study highlights six ethical tensions – such as the tension of balancing individual privacy and societal benefit – to show the competing ethical priorities surrounding genomic data and underpin the policy framework. To assist in thorough, diligent and nuanced discussion, the documents also provide a set of questions to guide ethical policy development.

“There is vast potential in the collection and use of genomic data to realize the promise of precision medicine, but we must develop forward-looking policies around genomic data before significant amounts of this data is generated,” said Catalina Lopez-Correa, Chief Operating Officer, Ruta N Medellin. “Low- and middle- income countries and emerging economies now have a unique opportunity to be ahead of the game by proactively developing policies around genomic data, and the World Economic Forum’s white paper will be extremely helpful in guiding policy development through providing frameworks and guidance around genomic data.”

The white paper should be used to drive multistakeholder discussion and decision-making, with the intent that policy-makers, business leaders, researchers and others leverage and adapt this work for use in a local context. To support this, the white paper is released with a companion ethical tensions guidance document and genomic data policy resource list.

Insufficient genomic data policies expose countries and communities to the risk that certain actors will extract genetic and biologic information from their population and use it for their own benefit. These risks have previously been realized – harming the Havasupai in the southwestern United States, the San in Southern Africa and others – and will occur again without undertaking a multistakeholder approach towards developing policies and regulations in a local context and with the inclusion of local populations.

The World Economic Forum’s Platform on Shaping the Future of Health and Healthcare aims to ensure that the 9.7 billion people on earth by 2050 have equal rights to access the highest standards of health and healthcare. In accordance with this mission, we are grateful to contribute a Genomic Data Policy Framework and Ethical Tensions white paper, as part of a set of tools.

Notes to editors
Read the white paper: Genomic Data Policy and Ethics: Unlocking the Value of Genomic Medicine for All
Explore the Forum’s Strategic Intelligence Platform and the Precision Medicine Transformation Map
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