Reports
Published: 11 January 2023

Embedding Indigenous Knowledge in the Conservation and Restoration of Landscapes

Indigenous peoples’ and local community lands cover a third of the earth’s territories. The fact that 91% of them are in good or fair ecological condition today is a testament to the effectiveness of long-term Indigenous stewardship in managing complex natural environments. Embedding traditional ecological knowledge and empowering Indigenous peoples as co-investment leaders in nature-based solutions brings value to both corporate action on nature and the long-term health of nature. This report puts forward a set of principles and practices to inform how investors should think and what investors should do to engage Indigenous peoples and their knowledge in conservation and restoration of landscapes.

Indigenous peoples’ and local community lands cover a third of the earth’s territories. The fact that 91% of them are in good or fair ecological condition today is a testament to the effectiveness of long-term Indigenous stewardship in managing complex natural environments. Embedding traditional ecological knowledge and empowering Indigenous peoples as co-investment leaders in nature-based solutions brings value to both corporate action on nature and the long-term health of nature. This report puts forward a set of principles and practices to inform how investors should think and what investors should do to engage Indigenous peoples and their knowledge in conservation and restoration of landscapes.

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