Social Innovation

Want to work for the world's tech giants? You'll need a particular set of skills

People use computers at an Internet cafe in Changzhi, north China's Shanxi province June 20, 2007. The blocking of Flickr is the latest casualty of China's ongoing battle to control its sprawling Internet. Wikipedia, and a raft of other popular Web sites, discussion boards and blogs have already fallen victim to the country's censors. China employs a complex system of filters and an army of tens of thousands of human monitors to survey the country's 140 million Internet users' surfing habits and surgically clip sensitive content from in front of their eyes.   To match feature PRIVACY-CHINA/   REUTERS/Stringer (CHINA) CHINA OUT - RTR1QYNB

You'll need a very particular set of skills if you want to get a job at some of the most competitive tech companies out there. Image: REUTERS/Stringer

Aine Cain
Careers Reporter, Business Insider
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Social Innovation

You'll need a very particular set of skills if you want to get a job at some of the most competitive tech companies out there.

Just look at the data compiled by job site Paysa. The site has reviewed tens of millions of résumés, provided by a combination of Paysa's partners, recruiters, and users.

Paysa took a closer look at the résumés of people who work at Google, Apple, and Microsoft, to get a sense of what skills those employees had in common.

All three companies made Business Insider's list of the best places to work in America. Microsoft employs 120,849 people; Apple's workforce weighs in at over 100,000 people; and Alphabet (Google's parent company) has 61,000 employees.

If you want to join any of those workforces, it definitely helps to know what they're looking for.

Paysa compiled a list of in-demand skills, in the four fields within tech that employ the most people.

Here's what you need to compete for a job with some of the biggest players in tech:

Designers should know:

1. User interface design

2. Graphic design

3. Web design

4. Photoshop

5. Illustrator

6. Information architecture

7. Art direction

Engineers should know:

1. c++/c/c#

2. Java

3. Software development

4. Python

5. Javascript

6. Agile methodologies

7. SQL

Product managers should know:

1. Project management

2. Leadership

3. Customer service

4. Strategy

5. Cloud computing

6. Product marketing

7. Enterprise software

Data scientists should know:

1. Data analysis

2. SQL

3. Project management

4. Machine learning

5. Data mining

6. Business analysis

7. Python

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Related topics:
Social InnovationEmerging-Market Multinationals
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