Future of Work

This is how Bill Gates defines success

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates at a forum on financial development at the 2016 IMF World Bank Spring Meeting in Washington April 17, 2016.      REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Now the richest man in the world with $85.2 billion to his name, Gates spends his days running the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, one of the most powerful charities in the world. Image: REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

Emmie Martin
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Future of Work?
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Future of Work is affecting economies, industries and global issues
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Future of Work

Whether it's money, power, or fame, success means something different to everyone.

For Bill Gates, it's defined by two factors: making a difference and taking care of the people closest to you.

"Warren Buffett has always said the measure [of success] is whether the people close to you are happy and love you," Gates explained during a Reddit AMA, or "ask me anything," on Monday, when asked about his idea of success.

"It is also nice to feel like you made a difference — inventing something or raising kids or helping people in need," he continued.

Although his inner circle is harder to penetrate, it's easy to see that Gates has certainly accomplished the latter piece of his answer.

At just 20, Bill Gates cofounded Microsoft with his childhood friend Paul Allen. Months before his 31st birthday, the company went public, making Gates a billionaire.

Now the richest man in the world with $85.2 billion to his name, Gates spends his days running the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, one of the most powerful charities in the world. The foundation — which controls an endowment of more than $40 billion — aims to lift millions of people out of poverty, with a heavy focus on eliminating HIV, malaria, and other infectious diseases.

Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Future of WorkEmerging-Market Multinationals
Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

6:22

Digital Cooperation Organization - Deemah Al Yahya

Kara Baskin

February 22, 2024

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum