Japan

Why people in Japan are being paid to have babies

A baby lies in a carriage as his mother receives bottled water at a ward office in Tokyo, March 24, 2011. Stores in Tokyo were running out of bottled water on Thursday after radiation from a damaged nuclear complex briefly made tap water unsafe for babies, while more nations curbed imports of Japanese food. Engineers are trying to stabilise a six-reactor nuclear plant in Fukushima, 250 km (150 miles) north of the capital, nearly two weeks after an earthquake and tsunami battered the plant and devastated northeast Japan, leaving nearly 26,000 people dead or missing.   REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won (JAPAN - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS) - GM1E73O1G4N01

On the island of Nakanoshima, parents get 100,000 yen (about $940) for their first baby. Image: REUTERS/Lee Jae-Won

Elena Holodny
Writer, Business Insider
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