Jobs and the Future of Work

This drone is a sheepdog

A herd of sheep move on the road as they return home from grazing fields outside Tbilisi, Georgia, November 11, 2015. Twice a year, in spring at the start of the grazing season and in  autumn at season's end, herds of sheep cross the country during a long march of hundreds of kilometres. REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili - GF20000054631

Above the herd. Image: REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili

Jon Christian
Writer, Futurism
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Drones

Sheep drones

Farmers in New Zealand have a new tool to herd sheep and cows, according to Radio New Zealand: drones outfitted with speakers that blast the sounds of dogs barking.

“That’s the one thing I’ve noticed when you’re moving cows and calves that the old cows stand up to the dogs, but with the drones, they’ve never done that,” shepherd Corey Lambeth told the station.

A Radio New Zealand video shows Lambeth corralling cows and sheep using a drone with a harsh digital bark.

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Dog days

Lambeth’s employer, Ben Crossley, confirmed that his fourth-generation farm is indeed using drones to control sheep. One favored model: the DJI Mavic Enterprise, which is already outfitted to play sounds — such as barking — over a speaker.

The Washington Post noted that farmers are already using drones around the world for a variety of farming tasks, *including* surveying crops.

Image: Statista

The Washington Post noted that farmers are already using drones around the world for a variety of farming tasks, including surveying crops. Having the devices deal directly with animals is less common — but it could be a vision of the future of agriculture.

Have you read?

Drone pups

Dogs, which were already used for herding in New Zealand, are learning to work alongside the drones, according to another story by Radio New Zealand.

“There’s definitely going to be places for dogs always on farm,” Lambeth told the station, but “the one downside of the Mavic [drones] or anything electronic is you still need to bring them in and charge them.”

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