Future of the Environment

Air pollution: Locked down by COVID-19 but not arrested

Average NO2 levels between March and April of this year were lower than the entirety of 2019. Image: REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

Urvashi Narain

Lead Economist, World Bank’s Environment, Natural Resources, and Blue Economy global practice

Share:
Our Impact
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Future of the Environment is affecting economies, industries and global issues
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Future of the Environment

Figure 1: NO2 levels declined sharply during the lock down globally
Average NO2 concentrations based on satellite data between March 15-April 30, 2020 (with lock down) Image: World Bank Staff
Figure 1: NO2 levels declined sharply during the lock down globally
Sentinel-5P Nitrogen Dioxide (tropospheric vertical column) data processed through Google Earth Engine. Image: World Bank Staff
Figure 2: NO2 levels declined sharply across South Asia during the lock down
Average NO2 concentrations based on satellite data between March 15-April 30, 2020 (with lock down) and March 15-April 30, 2019 (without lock down) Image: World Bank Staff
Daily 7-day rolling average NO2 concentrations based on ground-level monitors before, during, and after the lock down
Daily 7-day rolling average NO2 concentrations based on ground-level monitors before, during, and after the lock down Image: World Bank Staff
Figure 4: Impact of lock down on PM2.5 level was not as large in Hubei (China), France, and IGP (India)
Daily 7-day rolling average PM2.5 concentrations based on ground-level monitors before, during, and after the lock down Image: World Bank Staff
Figure 5: No impact of lock down on PM2.5 levels in Chinese cities
Daily 7-day rolling average PM2.5 concentrations based on ground-level monitors before, during, and after the lock down in Shanghai, Tainjin and Beijing Image: World Bank Staff
Figure 6: Mixed impact of lock down on PM2.5 levels in Indian cities
Daily 7-day rolling average PM2.5 concentrations based on ground-level monitors before, during, and after the lock down in New Delhi, Kolkata, and Mumbai Image: World Bank Staff
Examples of policy measures to reduce air pollution while supporting economic recovery
Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Future of the EnvironmentCOVID-19
Share:
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

Why is biodiversity so essential?

Kori Williams

February 2, 2023

About Us
Events
Media
Partners & Members
Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2023 World Economic Forum