Gender Inequality

Brazil announces equal pay for men's and women's national soccer teams

Soccer Football - Women's International Friendly - England v Brazil - Riverside Stadium, Middlesbrough, Britain - October 5, 2019  Brazil's Debinha celebrates scoring their second goal with team mates  Action Images via Reuters/Lee Smith - RC17DB097B60

The Brazil women’s team reached the World Cup final in 2007. Image: Action Images via Reuters

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Gender Inequality

  • Brazil's football confederation has announced it will pay its men's and women's teams equally.
  • Pay disparity in soccer and other sports has been in the spotlight in recent years.

The Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) said on Wednesday that its men’s and women’s national soccer teams will receive equal pay and prize money.

"There is no more gender difference, the CBF is treating men and women equally," CBF chief Rogerio Caboclo said in statement here.

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The CBF said that it had also appointed two women’s soccer coordinators, Duda Luizelli and Aline Pellegrino.

Pay disparity between men’s and women’s professional soccer players has been in the spotlight since the United States women’s team sued the governing body U.S. Soccer last year alleging gender discrimination in earnings and working conditions.

The team’s claims were dismissed by a court in May and a bid to immediately appeal the decision was denied.

Australian soccer’s governing body said in November that it had reached agreement with the players’ union on a new collective bargaining agreement that “closes the pay gap” between the men’s and women’s teams.

New Zealand and Norway have also moved to address the pay gap between their male and female players.

The Brazil women’s team reached the World Cup final in 2007 and Olympic finals in 2004 and 2008.

(Reporting by Shrivathsa Sridhar in Bengaluru Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

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