Arts and Culture

Why preserving cultural landmarks in a warming climate may mean transforming them

The Doge’s Palace and St. Mark’s Square are just two examples of cultural landmarks under threat from climate change. Image: REUTERS/Manuel Silvestri

Erin Seekamp

Professor of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, North Carolina State University

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In 1999 the National Park Service moved the historic Cape Hatteras Lighthouse 2,900 feet inland (new site at lower right in photo) to protect it from shoreline erosion. Image: Mike Booher/NPS
Cultural sites face storm-related flooding, erosion and inundation from rising seas. Image: James Corner Field Operations

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Arts and CultureClimate ChangeInfrastructureLong-Term Investing, Infrastructure and Development

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