Sustainable Development

These emerging economies are poised to lead shipping's net-zero transition

The shipping industry contributes close to 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions and cleaning it up represents a major opportunity, especially for developing countries. Image: REUTERS/Tatiana Meel

Margi Van Gogh
Head of Supply Chain and Transport, World Economic Forum
Ingrid Sidenvall Jegou
Project Director, Global Maritime Forum
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South Africa can be a key beneficiary of the decarbonization of shipping.
South Africa can be a key beneficiary of the decarbonization of shipping. Image: Global Maritime Forum
Boegoebaai shipping port is poised to become an export hub for green hydrogen and sustainable goods and services for South Africa's Northern Cape province
Boegoebaai shipping port is poised to become an export hub for green hydrogen and sustainable goods and services for South Africa's Northern Cape province Image: Global Maritime Forum

With over 100 shipping ports spread across its Atlantic and Pacific coastlines, Mexico connects to Asia, Africa and Europe.
With over 100 shipping ports spread across its Atlantic and Pacific coastlines, Mexico connects to Asia, Africa and Europe. Image: Global Maritime Forum
Manzanillo is one of the busiest shipping ports in Mexico and the third largest port in Latin America.
Manzanillo is one of the busiest shipping ports in Mexico and the third largest port in Latin America. Image: Global Maritime Forum

Indonesia is close to key shipping routes — the Strait of Malacca and the Sunda Strait
Indonesia is close to key shipping routes — the Strait of Malacca and the Sunda Strait. Image: Global Maritime Forum
Balikpapan shipping port could be developed into a green bunkering hub for domestic shipping, sourcing green fuels from an industrial park planned in the northern part of the island.
Balikpapan shipping port could be developed into a green bunkering hub for domestic shipping, sourcing green fuels from an industrial park planned in the northern part of the island. Image: Global Maritime Forum

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