Emerging Technologies

Here's what the world mined in 2021 in one infographic 

Industrial metals are largely used in steelmaking, construction, chemical manufacturing, and as alloying agents.

Industrial metals are largely used in steelmaking, construction, chemical manufacturing, and as alloying agents. Image: Unsplash/Russ Ward

Govind Bhutada
Author, Visual Capitalist
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Mining and Metals

  • Around 2.8 billion tonnes of metals were mined around the world in 2021.
  • Industrial metals used in steelmaking and construction accounted for a large part of this.
  • Technology metals – those used in electronic devices and clean energy – are used on a smaller scale, but could see faster consumption growth in the years ahead.
A graphic showing all industrial metals we mined.
A graphic showing all industrial metals we mined. Image: Visual Capitalist.

All the Metals We Mined in 2021

“If you can’t grow it, you have to mine it” is a famous saying that encapsulates the importance of minerals and metals in the modern world.

From every building we enter to every device we use, virtually everything around us contains some amount of metal.

The above infographic visualizes all 2.8 billion tonnes of metals mined in 2021 and highlights each metal’s largest end-use using data from the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

Why Do We Mine So Much Iron Ore?

Iron ore accounted for 93% of the metals mined in 2021, with 2.6 billion tonnes extracted from the ground. It’s important to note that this is ore production, which is typically higher than metal production since metals are extracted and refined from ores. For example, the iron metal content of this ore is estimated at 1.6 billion tonnes.

Iron ore is one of the most important industrial metals supporting urbanization and economic growth.
Iron ore is one of the most important industrial metals supporting urbanization and economic growth. Image: Visual Capitalist.

With 98% of it converted into pig iron to make steel, iron ore is ubiquitous in our lives. Steel made from iron ore is used in construction, transportation, and household appliances, and it’s likely that you encounter something made out of it every day, especially if you live in a city.

Due to its key role in building infrastructure, iron ore is one of the most important materials supporting urbanization and economic growth.

Industrial Metals

Industrial metals are largely used in steelmaking, construction, chemical manufacturing, and as alloying agents. In 2021, the world mined over 181 million tonnes of these metals.

A table showing industrial metals mine production in 2021.
Aluminium accounted for nearly 40% of industrial metal production in 2021. Image: Visual Capitalist.

Aluminium accounted for nearly 40% of industrial metal production in 2021. China was by far the largest aluminum producer, making up more than half of global production. The construction industry uses roughly 25% of annually produced aluminum, with 23% going into transportation.

Chromium is a lesser-known metal with a key role in making stainless steel stainless. In fact, stainless steel is usually composed of 10% to 30% of chromium, enhancing its strength and corrosion resistance.

Copper, manganese, and zinc round out the top five industrial metals mined in 2021, each with its own unique properties and roles in the economy.

Technology and Precious Metals

Technology metals include those that are commonly used in technology and devices. Compared to industrial metals, these are usually mined on a smaller scale and could see faster consumption growth as the world adopts new technologies.

Compared to industrial metals, technology metals are usually mined on a smaller scale
Compared to industrial metals, technology metals are usually mined on a smaller scale Image: Visual Capitalist.

The major use of rhenium, one of the rarest metals in terms of production, is in superalloys that are critical for engine turbine blades in aircraft and gas turbine engines. The petroleum industry uses it in rhenium-platinum catalysts to produce high-octane gasoline for vehicles.

In terms of growth, clean energy technology metals stand out. For example, lithium production has more than doubled since 2016 and is set to ride the boom in EV battery manufacturing. Over the same period, global rare earth production more than doubled, driven by the rising demand for magnets.

Indium is another interesting metal on this list. Most of it is used to make indium tin oxide, an important component of touchscreens, TV screens, and solar panels.

The Metal Mining Megatrend

The world’s material consumption has grown significantly over the last few decades, with growing economies and cities demanding more resources.

Global production of both iron ore and aluminum has more than tripled relative to the mid-1990s. Other metals, including copper and steel, have also seen significant consumption growth.

Today, economies are not only growing and urbanizing but also adopting mineral-intensive clean energy technologies, pointing towards further increases in metal production and consumption.

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