Climate Change

How frigid polar vortex blasts are connected to global warming

The city skyline is seen from the North Avenue Beach at Lake Michigan Image: REUTERS/Pinar Istek

Jennifer Francis

Research Professor, Rutgers University

Share:
Our Impact
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Climate Change is affecting economies, industries and global issues
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Climate Change

 Predicted near-surface air temperatures (F) for Wednesday morning, Jan. 30, 2019. Forecast by NOAA’s Global Forecast System model.
Predicted near-surface air temperatures (F) for Wednesday morning, Jan. 30, 2019. Forecast by NOAA’s Global Forecast System model. Image: Pivotal Weather, CC BY-ND
 Predicted near-surface air temperature differences (C) from normal, relative to 1981-2010
Predicted near-surface air temperature differences (C) from normal, relative to 1981-2010 Image: Pivotal Weather, CC BY-ND
 Dark arrows indicate rotation of the polar vortex in the Arctic; light arrows indicate the location of the polar jet stream when meanders form and cold, Arctic air dips down to mid-latitudes.
Dark arrows indicate rotation of the polar vortex in the Arctic; light arrows indicate the location of the polar jet stream when meanders form and cold, Arctic air dips down to mid-latitudes. Image: L.S. Gardiner/UCAR, CC BY-ND
Have you read?
 Predicted daily mean, near-surface temperature (C) differences from normal (relative to 1979-2000) for Jan. 28-30, 2019. Data from NOAA’s Global Forecast System model.
Predicted daily mean, near-surface temperature (C) differences from normal (relative to 1979-2000) for Jan. 28-30, 2019. Data from NOAA’s Global Forecast System model. Image: Climate Reanalyzer, Climate Change Institute, University of Maine., CC BY-ND
Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Climate ChangeUnited StatesCities and UrbanizationFuture of the Environment
Share:
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

Here's what the trauma of extreme weather events does to our brains - study

Jyoti Mishra

January 26, 2023

1:39
About Us
Events
Media
Partners & Members
Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2023 World Economic Forum