Global Health

Here's how a nerve-stimulation device has brought movement back to patients who are paralyzed

Patients were able to take their first steps within an hour of neurosurgeons first implanting prototypes of a nerve-stimulation device. Image: UNSPLASH/Chris Hardy

Nancy Lapid

Editor-in-Charge, Reuters Health

Ari Rabinovitch

Writer, Thomson Reuters Foundation

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A man in harness, walking whilst holding onto long handles.
'A 42-year-old patient performs training on a weight-supporting robot at Lausanne University Hospital after having received a spinal cord implant within the STIMO Bridge research, in this undated handout photo taken in Lausanne, Switzerland. He had been unable to move his legs for one year before he entered the project'. Image: NeuroRestore/Jimmy Ravier/Handout via REUTERS
A male scientist in white coat holding a test tube.
'A member of a research team who, as they say, have developed an implant of genetically engineered cells into the injured spinal cord of paralysed mice that has helped them walk again works at a laboratory at Tel Aviv University, Israel'. Image: REUTERS/Amir Cohen
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