Geo-Economics and Politics

Will the cost of living crisis ease next year? The global public thinks not

The rising cost of living is a serious cause for concern for millions of people around the world.

The rising cost of living is a serious cause for concern for millions of people around the world. Image: Unsplash/Viki Mohamad

Charlotte Edmond
Senior Writer, Forum Agenda
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Geo-Economics and Politics?
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Geo-economics is affecting economies, industries and global issues
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Geo-economics

Listen to the article

  • People expect inflation, interest rates and taxes to rise in 2023, according to a global Ipsos survey.
  • The majority of people expect their household spending to increase in the next six months, driven by utilities, shopping and motoring costs.
  • The public mostly blames the state of the global economy for the cost of living increases.
  • Although global poverty continues to fall, inflation, alongside the war and the pandemic, are slowing its decline.

Financial worries are particularly acute as rising inflation, interest rates and tax burdens weigh heavy on people’s minds right now.

And with significant cost of living increases throughout 2022, many people don’t hold out much hope for an improvement in finances next year. Inflation, interest rates, unemployment and taxes will all rise in 2023, people predict, according to the monthly Ipsos Global Inflation Monitor report.

Researchers interviewed almost 25,000 adults in 36 countries on their thoughts about the global economy. Nearly seven in 10 of them thought inflation would continue to rise and more than six in 10 thought interest rates and unemployment would climb.

As a result, nearly a third predicted their own standard of living would fall, with 37% expecting their disposable income to take a hit next year.

With significant cost of living increases throughout 2022, many people don’t hold out much hope for an improvement in finances next year.
With significant cost of living increases throughout 2022, many people don’t hold out much hope for an improvement in finances next year. Image: Ipsos

But while the majority of people expect inflation to keep rising during 2023, fewer overall currently hold this expectation than earlier in the year. When asked in November 2022, globally, 69% expected prices to rise in the next 12 months, compared to around three-quarters who held this view back in June 2022.

The public mostly blames the state of the global economy for the cost of living increases.
The public mostly blames the state of the global economy for the cost of living increases. Image: Ipsos

By contrast, compared to the summer, more people expect the employment situation in their country to deteriorate over the next 12 months.

Discover

How is the World Economic Forum ensuring sustainable global markets?

Personal finances

There is a little more optimism around the world when it comes to people’s own personal situations. More people expect their standards of living and disposable income to improve than did in April or June 2022. Although this masks some variation country to country – in richer nations there has been little change in view.

That said, the majority of people expect their household spending will continue to rise over the next six months. In particular, utilities – electricity, heating gas, etc – are expected to become more expensive.

A graphic depicting consumer predictions about future levels of household spending. cost of living
Utilities, shopping and transport costs are expected to rise. Image: Ipsos

What’s driving up the cost of living?

The blame for the rising cost of living is primarily placed on the global economy, but Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and individual countries’ financial governance and policies are also regularly cited.

A graphic depicting consumer opinions on the driving forces behind the rising cost of living.
Multiple factors feed into the growing cost of living. Image: Ipsos

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) warned over the summer that the global cost of living crisis catalysed by the war in Ukraine propelled 71 million people in the developing world into poverty. The consequence of surging food and energy prices tipped many more people into poverty much quicker than the shock of the pandemic, it said.

Although there are a billion fewer people living below the international poverty line than in 1990, it remains a vast problem. As of 2019 World Bank estimates, 650 million people live in extreme poverty globally with the pandemic, war and inflation having a significant impact on projections for improvement.

Have you read?
Loading...
Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Geo-Economics and PoliticsEconomic Growth
Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

9 ways national security and economic cooperation are evolving

Simon Lacey and Don Rodney Junio

June 3, 2024

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum