Aviation, Travel and Tourism

These Filipino fishermen are protecting endangered sharks - and boosting their incomes

A whale shark approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob. Image: REUTERS/David Loh

Judi Lowe

PhD Candidate, Southern Cross University

Share:

Our Impact
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Aviation, Travel and Tourism is affecting economies, industries and global issues
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale

Stay up to date:

Aviation, Travel and Tourism

Luigi Borromeo Image: A drone shot of whale shark tourism, about 100 metres from shore. The small boats with one person are feeders. The longer boats are for the tourists swimming with face masks to see the whale sharks.
Whale sharks come close to the coast to feed on krill. Image: Andre Snoopy Montenegro
Former fisherman Jesson Jumaud with his daughter Kheny May, who now goes to school. The profits of whale shark tourism mean they now have a brick house, and Jesson was able to buy a motor bike. He can feed their family three times a day with good food Image: Judi Lowe

Have you read?

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:

Aviation, Travel and TourismThe OceanBiodiversityFuture of the Environment

Share:

Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

Here are 5 things to look forward to in the future - according to 1,000 experts
About Us
Events
Media
Partners & Members
Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2022 World Economic Forum