Health and Healthcare Systems

France offers hotel rooms to domestic abuse victims as cases jump during lockdown

A member of the medical staff, wearing protective suit and face mask, works at an emergency COVID-19 center inside a gymnasium in Champigny-sur-Marne near Paris as the spread of the coronavirus disease continues in France, March 31, 2020. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes - RC21VF9VD6Z6

France has been under lockdown since 17 March. Image: REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

Elena Berton
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Health and Healthcare Systems?
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Education, Gender and Work is affecting economies, industries and global issues
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Education, Gender and Work

  • Reports of domestic abuse have risen by up to 32% in France.
  • In an effort to counter this, French officials announced they would pay for hotel rooms and open pop-up centres.
  • They will also provide an extra €1 million to anti-domestic abuse organizations.

France has announced it would pay for hotel rooms for victims of domestic violence and open pop-up counseling centers after figures showed the number of abuse cases had soared during the first week of a lockdown to curb the spread of coronavirus.

Have you read?

Gender Equality Minister Marlene Schiappa said about 20 centers would open in stores around the country so women could drop in for help while getting groceries.

The government also announced an extra one million euro ($1.1 million) for anti-domestic abuse organizations to help them respond to increased demand for services.

Coronavirus Covid-19 virus infection China Hubei Wuhan contagion spread economics dow jones S&P 500 stock market crash 1929 depression great recession
The chart above relates to confirmed cases of coronavirus in France, as of 1 April 2020. Image: Statista

The initiatives were launched after the government late last week said reports of domestic abuse to police had jumped 36% in Paris and 32% elsewhere in France after the restrictions came into force. The cases included two murders.

France began a nationwide lockdown on March 17 which will remain until at least April 15. No one is allowed to leave their home except to buy food or medication, visit a doctor, get exercise or walk a pet.

Activists have said the quarantine measures will lead to a surge in domestic violence and make it harder for victims to seek help.

Schiappa, who previously warned that the lockdown would create a “breeding ground for violence”, said France would pay for up to 20,000 hotel nights so that victims can escape abusive partners.

The pop-up centres will initially open across Paris and in Lille in northern France.

“My biggest concern is to multiply the points of contact with women. As it’s difficult for women to get out, we want to make sure that support systems can go to women,” Schiappa told French newspaper Le Parisien.

The first pop-up centers will open in malls owned by commercial real estate company Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield (URW).

“Hypermarkets are among the few stores still open today. We thought it would be good if victims of domestic violence, or people who know a victim, could meet associations near these places,” URW spokesman Pierre Hausswalt told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

France introduced a separate initiative last week to encourage women to report domestic abuse in pharmacies.

The move follows a similar one in Spain where women can go to their pharmacy and request a “Mask 19” - a code word that will alert the pharmacist to contact the authorities.

Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

Antimicrobial resistance is a leading cause of global deaths. Now is the time to act

Dame Sally Davies, Hemant Ahlawat and Shyam Bishen

May 16, 2024

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum