Health and Healthcare Systems

Working from home might not cut energy use as much as we’d hoped

Working from home might not be as sustainable as first thought. Image: Unsplash/Luke Peters

Charlotte Edmond
Senior Writer, Forum Agenda
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Health and Healthcare Systems?
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how COVID-19 is affecting economies, industries and global issues
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

COVID-19

  • We might suppose that avoiding commuting by working from home saves energy, but the benefits to our planet could be fewer than first thought.
  • Studies show the impact of home-working on energy use is unclear and unpredictable.
  • Home-working needs to be widespread and full-time for companies to see the biggest benefits.

Many hope that COVID-19 lockdowns could be a boon for the environment, by resulting in reduced energy consumption. But it seems the benefits could be far fewer than we’d like to think.

Despite mass home-working, some research suggests that overall energy savings are likely to be limited, and in many cases could be non-existent. In fact, we might actually be using more energy, according to a new report published in IOPscience.

Have you read?

The study’s authors reviewed existing research into the impact of home-working.They found of the 39 studies analyzed, 26 suggested that home-working cuts energy use through reduced travel to work and office energy consumption. Only eight studies suggest the impact was neutral or negative.

But once a wider range of impacts are included, such as non-work travel and home energy use, the savings are much smaller and more unpredictable. So despite assumptions about the energy-saving benefits of working from home, there is still a lot of uncertainty around how great they actually are.

“This lack of consensus on the energy and environmental benefits of teleworking has arguably contributed to the lack of coordinated promotion of teleworking by business or government, even in countries where multiple studies have been conducted,” the authors say.

environment renewable solar energy change transition friendly environment carbon footprint carbon emissions reduction change natural climate change global warming air pollution clean energy power renewables plastic plastics  Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
Online searches relating to home offices have surged in recent months. Image: Statista

Maximizing the savings

Available research suggests that the biggest energy savings are found when staff work from home full-time, rather than split time between the office and home. And even when home-working is full-time, other factors need to be considered, such as how commutes are often combined with other duties such as the school run and shopping.

environment renewable solar energy change transition friendly environment carbon footprint carbon emissions reduction change natural climate change global warming air pollution clean energy power renewables plastic plastics  Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
As more people work from home due to COVID-19, residential energy use in the US is predicted to rise by up to 8%. Image: Statista

For companies to see the biggest benefits from home-working, it needs to be widespread enough that they can downsize office space and maximize energy savings.

Swapping one thing for another

Among the reasons the drop in energy use is less than we might think is because time saved not commuting is often spent on leisure or social activities which involve travel anyway.

People who usually work from home often live further away from their office, meaning that they have much longer journeys on the days they do commute. For example, one study of UK workers found that those who work from home have, on average, a 17.2km-longer commute than those who are solely office-based.

environment renewable solar energy change transition friendly environment carbon footprint carbon emissions reduction change natural climate change global warming air pollution clean energy power renewables plastic plastics  Coronavirus china virus health healthcare who world health organization disease deaths pandemic epidemic worries concerns Health virus contagious contagion viruses diseases disease lab laboratory doctor health dr nurse medical medicine drugs vaccines vaccinations inoculations technology testing test medicinal biotechnology biotech biology chemistry physics microscope research influenza flu cold common cold bug risk symptomes respiratory china iran italy europe asia america south america north washing hands wash hands coughs sneezes spread spreading precaution precautions health warning covid 19 cov SARS 2019ncov wuhan sarscow wuhanpneumonia  pneumonia outbreak patients unhealthy fatality mortality elderly old elder age serious death deathly deadly
Research from before the crisis shows that workers with the option to work from home often do. Image: Statista

“The body of research on the subject shows that it is too simple to assume that teleworking is inevitably a more sustainable option. Unless workers and employers fully commit to the working-from-home model, many of the potential energy savings could be lost."

"A scenario after the threat of coronavirus has cleared where workers will want the best of both worlds - retaining the freedom and flexibility they found from working from home, but the social aspects of working at an office that they’ve missed out on during lockdown - will not deliver the energy savings the world needs,” study author Benjamin K Sovacool, Professor of Energy Policy at the Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex, told the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions.

Loading...
Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Health and Healthcare SystemsEnergy TransitionJobs and the Future of Work
Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

Gender and health equity will only come with universal access to eye health – here's why

Dr. Princess Ifeoma Ike

May 24, 2024

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum