Geo-Economics and Politics

The 'resignation equation' driving employees to quit: 5 economic stories to read this week

5 factors that drive employees to quit; The Eurozone’s economic outlook - these are the latest economic stories.

5 factors that drive employees to quit; The Eurozone’s economic outlook - these are the latest economic stories. Image: Unsplash/ Annie Spratt

Chinmay Jadhav
Senior Writer, Forum Agenda
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Geo-Economics and Politics?
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Geo-economics is affecting economies, industries and global issues
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Geo-economics

Listen to the article

  • This weekly round-up brings you key economic stories from the past seven days.
  • Top stories: 5 factors that drive employees to quit; The Eurozone’s economic outlook; State of the job market in OECD countries; Why the 4-day week might not work; How foreign currency reserves can help combat the global economic crisis.

1. The ‘resignation equation’: 5 factors that drive employees to quit

A fifth of workers say they are extremely or very likely to quit their jobs in 2022, according to a global PwC survey. This trend is being driven by 5 key factors – the so-called ‘resignation equation’.

These factors include people not finding a job fulfilling, not feeling they can be their true selves at work and not feeling that their team cares about them. So, what can companies do to attract and retain their staff?

Find out more about the ‘resignation equation’.

Reasons why workers are likely to resign. economic stories
Job fulfilment is a key issue behind workers deciding to quit. Image: PwC

2. The Eurozone’s economic outlook in 3 charts

Global economic growth will slow to 3.2% this year from 6.1% in 2021, the IMF predicts. This is caused by supply chain disruptions that are leading to soaring inflation and a cost-of-living crisis around the world.

The rising cost of living, driven by the war in Ukraine, is having a particular impact on Europe's economy.

This article – drawing on data from the European Commission’s Eurostat office – provides a snapshot of the economic outlook in the Eurozone and wider EU.

Learn more about the Eurozone's economy.

Global economic growth will slow to 3.2% this year from 6.1% in 2021, the IMF predicts.
Global economic growth will slow to 3.2% this year from 6.1% in 2021, the IMF predicts. Image: Eurostat

3. 3 charts that show the state of the job market in OECD countries

The OECD’s members span Europe, the Americas and the Pacific and include countries from Australia to Chile, Israel and the United States.

Now, two-thirds of OECD countries say unemployment is “below or equal to” pre-pandemic levels and unemployment across the 38 OECD member states stabilized at 5% in May 2022.

Read this article for a data-rich dive into OECD employment levels – and what the data could mean for the global economy.

Database showing unemployment rates in OCED total, Euro area, United States and Japan. economic stories
Unemployment is steadying across the OECD. Image: OCED.

4. The four-day work week may be too good to be true

The four-day working week continues to gain momentum, with pilots taking place in the UK, Ireland, US, Canada and Australia.

Have you read?

But is this too good to be true? While many firms may find it a better arrangement than a five-day working week, this article makes a case for why the concept needs further research and debate before we talk seriously about rolling it out.

Read more about the 5 main reasons the four-day week needs more thought.

5. What are foreign currency reserves and can they help combat the global economic crisis?

In the face of escalating energy prices and supply chain issues, developing countries are looking to shore up their foreign currency reserves.

But what are foreign currency reserves? And what role do they play in promoting economic stability?

Read this article to find out more about this topic.

Can large foreign currency reserves help combat the global economic crisis?
Can large foreign currency reserves help combat the global economic crisis? Image: Statista
Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Geo-Economics and PoliticsEconomic GrowthFinancial and Monetary Systems
Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

World Bank says global economy stabilizing and other economics stories to read

Joe Myers

June 14, 2024

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum