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What are the 'positive tipping points' that could help us accelerate out of climate disaster?

Climate 'tipping points' are the dangerous phenomena that could suddenly make climate change even worse than it is already: melting ice sheets that could change ocean currents, thawing permafrost that releases vast amounts of methane, or rainforests turning into dry savannah - events that could completely destabilise the global environment and would be hard or impossible to reverse. But, according to a growing number of climate scientists, there is also the prospect of ‘positive tipping points’. Things that can happen to speed up the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in ways that humanity has so far failed to achieve. One of those is Tim Lenton, Professor of Climate Change and Earth System Science at the University of Exeter. As you will hear in the interview, other climate experts use terms such as 'social tipping points' or 'sensitive intervention points' - Professor Lenton says these are similar concepts that altogether should dispel the notion that we are doomed by climate change.

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Tinder Swindler: how 'romance fraud' became a multi-billion dollar cybercrime

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What are the 'positive tipping points' that could help us accelerate out of climate disaster?

 • 21 minutes

Climate 'tipping points' are the dangerous phenomena that could suddenly make climate change even worse than it is already: melting ice sheets that could change ocean currents, thawing permafrost that releases vast amounts of methane, or rainforests turning into dry savannah - events that could completely destabilise the global environment and would be hard or impossible to reverse. But, according to a growing number of climate scientists, there is also the prospect of ‘positive tipping points’. Things that can happen to speed up the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in ways that humanity has so far failed to achieve. One of those is Tim Lenton, Professor of Climate Change and Earth System Science at the University of Exeter. As you will hear in the interview, other climate experts use terms such as 'social tipping points' or 'sensitive intervention points' - Professor Lenton says these are similar concepts that altogether should dispel the notion that we are doomed by climate change.

 • 21 minutes

Climate 'tipping points' are the dangerous phenomena that could suddenly make climate change even worse than it is already: melting ice sheets that could change ocean currents, thawing permafrost that releases vast amounts of methane, or rainforests turning into dry savannah - events that could completely destabilise the global environment and would be hard or impossible to reverse. But, according to a growing number of climate scientists, there is also the prospect of ‘positive tipping points’. Things that can happen to speed up the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in ways that humanity has so far failed to achieve. One of those is Tim Lenton, Professor of Climate Change and Earth System Science at the University of Exeter. As you will hear in the interview, other climate experts use terms such as 'social tipping points' or 'sensitive intervention points' - Professor Lenton says these are similar concepts that altogether should dispel the notion that we are doomed by climate change.

'We have the most to benefit, but also the most to lose': how AI could transform human health

 • 37 minutes

Artificial intelligence has the potential to massively improve human health: from developing new drugs to providing more accurate diagnoses and helping people who live with severe disabilities. But AI also has the potential, if used wrongly or governed badly, to make life worse for people dealing with health problems. In this episode, we hear from people on the front lines of the technology. Speakers: Victor Pineda, president and founder of the Victor Pineda Foundation/World ENABLED. Alexandra Reeve Givens , CEO, Center for Democracy and Technology Chris Mansi, CEO, Viz.ai Daphne Koller, founder and CEO of Insitro

 • 37 minutes

Artificial intelligence has the potential to massively improve human health: from developing new drugs to providing more accurate diagnoses and helping people who live with severe disabilities. But AI also has the potential, if used wrongly or governed badly, to make life worse for people dealing with health problems. In this episode, we hear from people on the front lines of the technology. Speakers: Victor Pineda, president and founder of the Victor Pineda Foundation/World ENABLED. Alexandra Reeve Givens , CEO, Center for Democracy and Technology Chris Mansi, CEO, Viz.ai Daphne Koller, founder and CEO of Insitro

Tourism is bouncing back - but can we make travel sustainable?

 • 61 minutes

With the pandemic well behind us, international travel has bounced back. The World Economic Forum’s Travel and Tourism Development Index, a major survey of the state of the sector, gives a clear picture of how things look around the world. Maksim Soshkin, who leads much of the Forum’s work on the issue tells us the headlines, and Jacqueline Gifford, Editor-in-Chief of Travel + Leisure magazine, gives her take on the state of the travel scene. One of the key areas the TTDI looks at is sustainability - the impact of travel and tourism on the environment and local communities. And in this episode we hear from two people engaged in making tourism more sustainable: a hotel company taking action across its supply chain, and the head of tourism for Rwanda, where income from foreign visitors helps conserve a unique ecosystem and its endangered mountain gorillas. Speakers: Maksim Soshkin, Centre for Energy and Materials, World Economic Forum Jacqueline Gifford, Editor-in-Chief, Travel + Leisure Neil Jacobs, CEO, Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas Michaella Rugwizangoga, Chief Tourism Officer, Rwanda

 • 61 minutes

With the pandemic well behind us, international travel has bounced back. The World Economic Forum’s Travel and Tourism Development Index, a major survey of the state of the sector, gives a clear picture of how things look around the world. Maksim Soshkin, who leads much of the Forum’s work on the issue tells us the headlines, and Jacqueline Gifford, Editor-in-Chief of Travel + Leisure magazine, gives her take on the state of the travel scene. One of the key areas the TTDI looks at is sustainability - the impact of travel and tourism on the environment and local communities. And in this episode we hear from two people engaged in making tourism more sustainable: a hotel company taking action across its supply chain, and the head of tourism for Rwanda, where income from foreign visitors helps conserve a unique ecosystem and its endangered mountain gorillas. Speakers: Maksim Soshkin, Centre for Energy and Materials, World Economic Forum Jacqueline Gifford, Editor-in-Chief, Travel + Leisure Neil Jacobs, CEO, Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spas Michaella Rugwizangoga, Chief Tourism Officer, Rwanda

Tinder Swindler: how 'romance fraud' became a multi-billion dollar cybercrime

 • 41 minutes

The Netflix documentary 'The Tinder Swindler' is a mind-boggling case of so-called 'romance fraud' in which a charming, handsome - and apparently very rich - man meets women on a dating app - gets them to fall in love with him - and then cons them out of lots of money. Cecilie Fjellhøy is the Norwegian woman at the centre of the documentary whose life was torn apart by the actions of a conman. A survivor of romance fraud on a grand scale, she now advocates for the rights of, and support for, others who find themselves in similar grim circumstances. We also hear from Sean Doyle, who works at the World Economic Forum’s Centre for Cybersecurity, on just how widespread romance fraud really is, why it’s a multinational, multi-billion form of cyber crime, and what is being done to combat it.

 • 41 minutes

The Netflix documentary 'The Tinder Swindler' is a mind-boggling case of so-called 'romance fraud' in which a charming, handsome - and apparently very rich - man meets women on a dating app - gets them to fall in love with him - and then cons them out of lots of money. Cecilie Fjellhøy is the Norwegian woman at the centre of the documentary whose life was torn apart by the actions of a conman. A survivor of romance fraud on a grand scale, she now advocates for the rights of, and support for, others who find themselves in similar grim circumstances. We also hear from Sean Doyle, who works at the World Economic Forum’s Centre for Cybersecurity, on just how widespread romance fraud really is, why it’s a multinational, multi-billion form of cyber crime, and what is being done to combat it.

Spatial computing: why the future of the internet is 3D

 • 36 minutes

'Spatial computing', 'blended reality', 'the metaverse'. For those of us who still use screens and keyboards to access the digital world, those phrases might not mean very much. But many experts believe the '2D' internet will soon be a thing of the past, and we will all be, one way or another, in a 3D metaverse. With Apple's Vision Pro headset renewing interest in virtual reality, we speak to two proponents of the metaverse who see both huge opportunities and significant risks. Guests: Yonatan Raz-Fridman, CEO of Supersocial and host of the podcast “Into the Metaverse” Brittan Heller, lecturer on International Law, Technology, and Human Rights, Stanford University.

 • 36 minutes

'Spatial computing', 'blended reality', 'the metaverse'. For those of us who still use screens and keyboards to access the digital world, those phrases might not mean very much. But many experts believe the '2D' internet will soon be a thing of the past, and we will all be, one way or another, in a 3D metaverse. With Apple's Vision Pro headset renewing interest in virtual reality, we speak to two proponents of the metaverse who see both huge opportunities and significant risks. Guests: Yonatan Raz-Fridman, CEO of Supersocial and host of the podcast “Into the Metaverse” Brittan Heller, lecturer on International Law, Technology, and Human Rights, Stanford University.

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