Agriculture, Food and Beverage

After 5 years of endless drought, Honduran farmers are facing desperate choices

A woman and her son walk in their drought-affected plot, in the southern village of San Francisco de Coray, in the department of Valle, Honduras, August 13, 2015. Linked to the El Nino weather phenomenon, this year's drought has hit subsistence farmers living in Central America's "dry corridor" that runs through parts of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua, hard. The U.N. World Food Program (WFP) warned the extended dry spell, which is expected to last until March 2016, will lead to a drastically reduced harvest as drought destroys bean and maize crops, local media reported. Picture taken August 13, 2015. Image: REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera

Anastasia Moloney

Latin America and Caribbean Correspondent, Thomson Reuters Foundation

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Michelle, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, protects her tent from rainwater while taking refuge at a shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 29, 2018.
Michelle, a migrant from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, protects her tent from rainwater while taking refuge at a shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 29, 2018. Image: REUTERS/Adrees Latif
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A woman shows a cucumber at her drought-affected plot, in the southern village of San Francisco de Coray, in the department of Valle, Honduras, August 13, 2015. Linked to the El Nino weather phenomenon, this year's drought has hit subsistence farmers living in Central America's
A woman shows a cucumber at her drought-affected plot, in the southern village of San Francisco de Coray, in the department of Valle, Honduras, August 13, 2015. Linked to the El Nino weather phenomenon, this year's drought has hit subsistence farmers living in Central America's Image: REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera
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