Future of the Environment

From Australia to Africa, fences are stopping Earth’s great animal migrations

Fences are the enemy of migration. Image: REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

Bill Laurance

Distinguished Research Professor and Australian Laureate, James Cook University

Penny van Oosterzee

Adjunct Associate Professor James Cook University and University Fellow Charles Darwin University, , James Cook University

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Future of the Environment

 Emus attempting to cross the Rabbit-Proof Fence in Western Australia.
Emus attempting to cross the Rabbit-Proof Fence in Western Australia. Image: Western Australia Department of Agriculture & Food
 A zebra noses a fence in Kenya.
A zebra noses a fence in Kenya. Image: Duncan Kimuyu
 Elephants and Banteng graze in Kuri Buri National Park in Thailand, vestiges of a once-massive fauna that migrated annually across Indochina.
Elephants and Banteng graze in Kuri Buri National Park in Thailand, vestiges of a once-massive fauna that migrated annually across Indochina. Image: Pattarapong/iStock
 Cost-benefit assessment for 33 massive ‘development corridors’ that are proposed or under construction in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Cost-benefit assessment for 33 massive ‘development corridors’ that are proposed or under construction in Sub-Saharan Africa. Image: William Laurance
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 Lions attacking an Angolan Giraffe, one facet of Botswana’s complex migratory ecosystems.
Lions attacking an Angolan Giraffe, one facet of Botswana’s complex migratory ecosystems. Image: Michael Cohen
 Botswana is expected to have over 40,000 tourism-related jobs by 2028, showing their key importance to the national economy.
Botswana is expected to have over 40,000 tourism-related jobs by 2028, showing their key importance to the national economy. Image: Travel & Tourism Economic Impact: Botswana 2018
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Related topics:
Future of the EnvironmentMigrationClimate Change
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