Future of the Environment

These stunning photographs show how vital mangroves are to the health of the planet

Mangroves do more for their ecosystems than most other species on the planet. Image: Unsplash/Timothy K

Katharine Rooney

Senior Writer, Formative Content

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mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
Deep in a mangrove forest in Bangladesh, a wild honey gatherer subdues bees with smoke. Image: Mangrove Action Project
mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
Most of the mangroves found along the United Arab Emirates coastline are in Abu Dhabi, where they act as a green lung for the city. Image: Mangrove Action Project
mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
“After four days of tracking the elusive Bengal tiger,” writes the photographer, “we were finally able to predict where this individual might cross a creek. These big cats have adapted to life in the mangroves, and shadow through creeks and channels in search of prey.” Image: Mangrove Action Project
mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
The sun sets on the shore following community mangrove restoration and beach cleaning. Image: Mangrove Action Project
mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
Born on the beach, green turtles grow up in the open ocean, dine on seagrass and seek refuge in mangroves and coral reefs. Image: Mangrove Action Project
mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
“The plastic problem in this part of the world is huge,” says the photographer who captured this image, “ and the mangroves are threatened and slowly suffocating in plastic waste.” Image: Mangrove Action Project
mangrove ecosystem biodiversity keystone species sustainability photography woodland global health environment nature climate change global warming
The Clapper Rail is an elusive waterbird that has not been seen in this part of Florida for over six years. This one has found shelter in a small stretch of coastal mangroves. Image: Mangrove Action Project
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Future of the EnvironmentBiodiversityClimate Change

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