Climate Change

Global Warming Chart - Here's How Temperatures Have Risen Since 1950

global-warming-chart-average-world-temperature

The global temperature average has increased by 0.82 degrees Celsius when compared to the 20th century average. Image: Pixabay/qimono

Willem Roper
Editor, Statista
Share:
Our Impact
What's the World Economic Forum doing to accelerate action on Climate Change?
The Big Picture
Explore and monitor how Climate Change is affecting economies, industries and global issues
A hand holding a looking glass by a lake
Crowdsource Innovation
Get involved with our crowdsourced digital platform to deliver impact at scale
Stay up to date:

Climate Change

  • Global warming led to 2020 and 2016 being around 1.2 degrees Celsius hotter than the average temperature during the 19th century.
  • Scientists increasingly believe in a direct relationship between global warming and catastrophic weather events such as flooding.
  • As per this global warming chart, the average global temperatures are rising.

Global warming has led to 2020 being tied with 2016 as the hottest year ever recorded by scientists, according to a new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The report shows data that has become quite common over the last decades, with temperatures inching up higher and higher from the 20th century average. A look into the data of temperature increases over the last decade shows the rate of increase appears to be rising.

According to data collected by Bloomberg from the NOAA, the global temperature average has increased by 0.82 degrees Celsius when compared to the 20th century average. The rate of increase, however, increased to roughly 0.18 degrees Celsius each decade since 1981, signaling a quickening of both warming surface and ocean temperatures across the globe. Overall, 2020 and 2016 were around 1.2 degrees Celsius hotter than the average temperature during the 19th century, with 2019 coming very close. While scientists predict 2021 to be another top 10 hottest year, the enormous weather pattern La Niña in the Pacific Ocean is expected to bring cooler temperatures than previous years.

Have you read?

Miniscule changes in the global warming chart are, and will continue to have, drastic consequences related to weather events and patterns. Wildfires, hurricanes, floods and droughts are some of the most common, and have already seen a noticeable uptick in occurrences over the last few decades. According to Bloomberg, scientists’ confidence in the direct relationship between catastrophic weather events and rising global temperatures continues to rise each year.

Ultimately, decades-old models from climate scientists across the world have been relatively accurate with how temperatures would increase by 2020. Carbon dioxide pollution has been one of the largest drivers of this rise, many scientists say, and even a swift cutback on emissions may prove ineffective in completely halting the rapid temperature increases.

Global-Warming-Chart-temperatire-change-yearly
Overall, 2020 and 2016 were around 1.2 degrees Celsius hotter than the average temperature during the 19th century. Image: Statista
Loading...
Don't miss any update on this topic

Create a free account and access your personalized content collection with our latest publications and analyses.

Sign up for free

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum articles may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

Related topics:
Climate ChangeEnergy Transition
Share:
World Economic Forum logo
Global Agenda

The Agenda Weekly

A weekly update of the most important issues driving the global agenda

Subscribe today

You can unsubscribe at any time using the link in our emails. For more details, review our privacy policy.

Green job vacancies are on the rise – but workers with green skills are in short supply

Andrea Willige

February 29, 2024

About Us

Events

Media

Partners & Members

  • Join Us

Language Editions

Privacy Policy & Terms of Service

© 2024 World Economic Forum